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[[underline]] Question: [[/underline]]

Why do your men paint such large pictures?


[[underline]] Answer: [[/underline]] 

If the artist feels his concept forces him to make a big statement, it then becomes a pictorial necessity. This justifies it's validity.


[[underline]] Question: [[/underline]]

Do any of your artists submit to outside demands?


[[underline]] Answer: [[/underline]] 

They do as they please. The people who ask this question are really interested in knowing whether the artist compromises. My answer is that my commitment to them is based on the fact that they won't compromise.


[[underline]] Question: [[/underline]]

How do you expect the public to receive this lack of compromise and use these pictures in their homes?


[[underline]] Answer: [[/underline]] 

These pictures, to me, require no special space because they are large. They don't require excess room. They look just as well, as a matter of facet better, and more intimate, in a small room. They enlarge the room. They back the walls away. They create space rather than diminish it. That I am convinced of. I have seen it happen.


[[underline]] Question: [[/underline]]

What is the difference between European and American abstract art?


[[underline]] Answer: [[/underline]] 

Art is universal, and I dislike making geographical differences. However, a European abstract painter is more involved with the interior, with something between four walls, while the American abstract painter is outside the interior. And I know European painting very well. I was there this summer also two years ago, and I have spent many other years there. The present day European abstract painter is more concerned with   


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