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Esther McCoy                                8

or sketches.  Just nothing.  Don't panic, just take the elevation as far as you can go with the information you have.  I worked determinedly, but always at the back of my mind was the certainty that if I had had two, even one year at USC I would have known where to find those dimensions. To keep my spirits up I began revising Schindler's kitchen layout in the plan.  I lined up the equipment in a way most women would use it. There were a few Sweets catalogues in the shelves that divided the room, and I consulted them for typical width of new dishwashers, but the Sweets were very old.  I had noted earlier the absence of all architectural magazines in the office.  This was curious. All the other architects' offices I had seen had a number of magazines around.  In fact, some of their own buildings were published in them.
     Then I noticed a curious thing--a line of small mayonnaise jars filled with nuts and bolts and attached to the under side of the shelf.  I remembered seeing Schindler unscrew one bottle and empty the contents into his jacket pocket before he left.  I examined them.  The metal caps of the jars were screwed to the underside of the shelf, and with one hand he had twisted one off.  I was charmed by the ingenuity; it was like some of the solutions for aircraft design that had come out of the same sort of close observation.  Maybe, I thought, this was a clue to his design; something too preposterously simple to gain attention. 
     I began to notice other things in the office that were based

Transcription Notes:
as editor intended on the page. was previously: something too prepost [[stikethrough]] u [[/strikethrough]] ^[[e]] rously simple to gain attention.

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