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Telephone 2-3111 
SYRACUSE AMERICAN--A Paper for People Who Think--Sunday, August 29, 1937
Telephone 2-3111

Two Skeletons in Woods Bare 'Elopement in Death'
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LOVE TANGLE SEQUEL SEEN IN DISCOVERY
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Affection Turned to Tragedy Revealed by Grewsome Find Not Far from Ausable Forks
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Murder and Suicide Are Believed by Authorities To Be Riddle's Answer
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--The stolen love of Mrs. Ransom Smith, 42, and George McDonald, also 42, and unmarried, both of Essex County town, ended with an "elopement in death."
The love that turned to tragedy for the pair ended in sudden murder and suicide last spring, but their fatal last tryst was not revealed until the other day when a woman berry picker stumbled upon their skeletons in a wooded pine copse outside the town. 
Evidence in the grim case, according to Coroner George J. Culver, indicated that the couple, enmeshed in a hopeless love, took the only way out of their affair that seemed possible to them. 
The man, apparently, stabbed his sweetheart to death with the rusted knife found between their bodies and then cut his own throat. 
Their disappearance last May 5 occasioned a hum of gossip in the village, but it gradually died away. Everybody surmised that the couple had run away together. Nobody suspected that their elopement was one with death. 
But the other day, picking blackberries with her husband, Mrs. William Smith, 48, of Ausable Forks, entered a clump of pines. 
Side by side, she saw two skeletons. 
Screaming, she ran from the thicket. 
Her husband, believing perhaps that a bear had frightened his wife, hurried to her side. 
He then investigated, and called police. 
Inspector Joseph B. Lynch of the bureau of criminal investigation

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MORE CHILD BRIDES
[[IMAGE]]
Cleone Goad, 13, Martinez, Calif., became the bride of Leonard Newlun, 30, Oakland, Calif., in a ceremony performed by a justice of the peace. International News photos. 
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MARTINEZ, Calif., Aug 28--
After evading a Baptist minister who sought to prevent the marriage. Cleone Goad, 13, Martintz school girl, and Leonard Newlun, 30, Oakland, Calif., street railway employe, were married by Justice of the Peace E. P. Jackson of Concord, Calif. 
Newlun is the brother of his young bride's stepfather. Hence, by marriage, Mrs. Gertrude Goad Newlun, the bride's mother, becomes her own daughter's sister-in-law, and Cleone's step-father becomes her brother-in-law. 
A threat of annulment came as a result of a controversy over the girl's age, starting when the couple applied for a license. 
Rev. John R. George, Baptist minister, protested to County Clerk S. C. Wells that the girl was only 13. 

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[[IMAGE]]
Twelve-year-old Leta Craif of Wellsburg, W. Va., now Mrs. John Painter, who was married to her 18-yr-old husband under revised West Virginia marriage laws. 
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Leta Craig, 12, is now Mrs. John Painter. She was married recently to her 18-year-old husband under the revised West Virginia laws. 

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FIRST WOMAN FLIER LIVING IN ROCHESTER
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Mrs. Scott Took Plane Aloft In 1910 at Hammondsport Under Tutelage of Curtiss
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By Staff Correspondent. 
ROCHESTER, Aug. 28.--She never hears the roar of giant transport planes in the sky above her nor reads of fliers crossing oceans or making 'round-the-world flights but that she goes back in memory to a fall day a quarter of a century ago. 
She is Blanche Stuart Scott, one of the first women, if not the first, in America to fly an airplane, and she lives in Rochester. 
She well recalls her first flight, Oct. 22, 1910, at Hammondsport, under the tutelage of that aviation pioneer, Glenn, H. Curtiss. She was only supposed to taxi the crude biplane about the field, but the first thing she knew she was soaring aloft. 
Blanche Scott had been an automobile driver of renown--in fact, she was the first woman in the Nation to make a transcontinental trip by motor, and she knew something about mechanics. At any rate, she made a perfect landing, 

[[fifth column]]
Rush of Bible to Court That Didn't Have Even One

WHITE PLAINS, Aug. 28. - 
Clerks of the Westchester County courthouse in White Plains are trying to decide how many Bibles to take, and from whom.
The offers started pouring in by mail and telephone when it was discovered a few days ago that there wasn't a single Bible on the-
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--entire six floor of the court building.
The search developed only the information that witnesses used to be sworn by raising hand and placing the other on a Bible, but that later the court's Bible or Bibles disappeared.
Of recent years witnesses have been sworn merely by taking an oath to tell the truth.
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and then and there began a flying career that sent her name into the headlines of those days before the war. 
She appeared a few months later at Fort Wayne, Ind., as the first woman ever to appear in an exhibition flight in the United States. Then, in the fall of 1911, came a crowning feat. From a field near Boston she flew 60 miles inland, and was hailed as the "great woman distance flier."
She next toured the country with the "Great Aerial Flying Circus," with such skyhawks as Lincoln Beachey and Glenn Martin. She was acclaimed as the first woman flier on the Pacific Coast. 
While flying at Squantom Field, near Bostin, in 1913, she saw a fellow woman pilot, Miss Harriet Quimby, the first woman to fly the English Channel, killed in a crash. Miss Scott brought her plan to a landing and fainted at the controls. But she kept on flying, hanging up her helmet in 1917. She has never flown a plane since, but last year took her first ride in a transcontinental transport ship. She was thrilled by the
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smoothness of the ride, by the power of the great ship, but this pioneer of women fliers could not help comparing the hazards of a quarter century ago, when she and others were blazing the airway trails, with the efficient, farflung aviation industry of today. 
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2 LIVES IN PERIL AS AUTO SMASHES BRIDGE
LINDSAY, Ont., Aug. 28.-Two Toronto men twice miraculously escaped death in the space of five minutes when their car knocked down the steel and cement bridge over Emily Creek near here. 
John. H Edmonds and George F. Duthie were returning from a dance near midnight. His eyes blinded by lights of an approaching care, Edmonds lost control of the wheel. Striking the girders of the bridge with such force as to dislodge the structure from its foundation, the car hurtled into the water. 
Edmonds and Duthie spent a few depsperate minutes under water before they could splash their way out of the auto and struggle to the surface.
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Three U.S. Girls Hike in Austria
VIENNA, Aug. 28. (INS)-Three pretty American girls, Joan, Sylvia and Lilly Loezere of Buffalo, are hiking through Austria, Yugoslavia and Albania to Tirana where they expect to meet King Zogu.
The three girls who study sociology at the Paris University, are traveling on foot, armed with revolvers knives and dimples, and also a letter of introductions to the bachelor king of Albania.
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PERFECT SHOOTING BEATS CITY RECORD
CLARKSBURG, Wa. Va., Aug. 28 (INS).-There's no doubt to it that Farmer-Sportsman Henry W. Bassel rates his position as president of 
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the Harrison County Rod and Gun Club. During a recent skeet shoot match, Bassel broke 25 clay pigeons with 25 shots. It was the first time in the history of the Willow Beach range that the fat was accomplished.
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[[advertisement]]
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For the relief of 
ASTHMA and Hay Fever
Sold under Guaranteer!
PASCAL COMPANY
Textile Tower, Seattle, Wash.
[[/advertisement]]
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[[/advertisement]]
ADVERTISEMENT      ADVERTISEMENT
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FELT SLEEPY AFTER MEALS, SLUGGISH, TIRED AND RUNDOWN.

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Also suffered From Constipation, Stomach Gas and Distress. Says Nu-Erb Gave Him Grand Relief.
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"I was troubled with constipation and gas filled my stomach after meals, causing me distress, and I often felt so sleepy that I couldn't keep my eyes open," says Mr. John Marte, 307 N. Lowell av., Syracuse, N.Y. "I felt sluggish, tired and rundown. I started taking Nu-Erb. 
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awhile ago and I am certainly surprised how different I feel now. My bowels act regularly every day, the gas and stomach distress have gone away and those sleepy spells do not come over me. That tired, listless feeling is all gone and I feel better than I have for a long time. I can certainly recommend Nu-Erb very highly."
Nu-erb is now being introduced in Syracuse at Powers Drug Store, 114 E. Washington St.
[[/advertisement]]
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Last Days of Fleischman's August Sale!
CLASSIFIED MONTH-END CLEARANCE

[[box]]
TREMENDOUS SAVING THROUGHOUT THE STORE!
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[[box]]

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DINETTE SETS
$149 6-PIECE WALNUT Dinette Set.
Refectory table. Now $84.50.

$198 ELGIN SIMONDS 8-PIECE Dinette.
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$249 9-PIECE HAREWOOD SUITE. Elgin Simonds. Now $109.50.

$159 ENAMELED 6-piece Grand Rapids Suite. Now $74.50.

MANY OTHER BARGAINS in beautiful Dinette Suites.

LAMPS

FLOOR LAMP with silk shade. Regularly $9.95. Sale price $4.95.

BRIDGE OUTFITS

BRIDGE SET. Regularly $13.95 Gaylo Quality. Sale price $6.90.

BRIDGE TABLES. Folding style. Regularly $1.00. Sale price 49c.

MANY OTHERS at Reduced Prices.

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