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right receives key from Betty ?ey (inrear) at official open-? Edgerton Park yesterday.
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Rauber Holds Welfare Blast
Supervisor Val H. Rauber, Democratic minority leader yesterday psponed an expected blast on the county welfare investigation until tomorrow.

For reasons best known to himself, Rauber did not launch the attack upon the Macken Committee that is surveying welfare costs at yesterday's meeting of the board of Supervisors. Rauber said he would take it up at tomorrow's meeting.
He demanded a report in August and has permitted the matter to remain untouched since. Traditionally, October meetings are campaign sounding boards, it was recalled.
The solons yesterday approved a $50,000 highway improvement in Edgemere Dr., Greece and authorized payments of sums for rights of way for the proposed Goodman st. extension in Irondequoit. The $6,855 will go to: Jean K. Clements executrix, Ryland M. Kendrick estate, $2,440; George Rappl and George Hoenig, $3,175; Paul V. Imhof, $75 and William Marasco, $1,165. The board also voted to pay Otto H. and Katherine B. Reichardt $668 for the rights of way in Gordon Rd., Sweden and Avery Grettan $100 for the same purpose.
Fulsome praise for the board and the county administration in expanding Rochester Airport facilities was paid by State Commerce Commissioner Harold Keller in a letter to chairman Gordon A. Howe. He spoke of the "energy and vision of the board" and congraulated it for establishing a coordinated air zoning program with towns adjacent to the Scottsville Rd. airport. The county today will dedicate its new 5,000 foot, instrument runway, the first stage in the development of the port.
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Bystander Arrested After Auto Collision

His interest in a slight traffic accident in Griffith St. at about 2 p. m. yesterday landed Joseph G Keller, 42, 721 Culver Rd. in a police cell on charges of interfering with an officer and public intoxication. Patrolman Harvey Kusse of the Accident Prevention Bureau said Kelar got himself tangled into Krusse' investigation of the accident at Griffith and Pearl Sts. to an extent where he had to be taken to police headquarters in handcuffs. The accident, in which no one was hurt, involved a truck driven by Edward Atman, 54, of 176 Griffith St., and an automobile operated by Frank Marsiglia, 26, of 17 Pearl St.

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through next Saturday night under the direction of Arthur M Windsor and M. Sanford Abbey, cochairmen.

Highlight of this year's show features a 6-room, ranch type house built by the association as a joint venture. Modern dwelling erected in 10 days, contains a living room, den, dining alcove, two bedrooms, tile bath, modern kitchen and attached garage. The house, less furnishings, can be duplicated in this area for $12,600.

The exhibit, occupying more floor space than in past years, offers demonstrations of all recent developments in home-building and labor-saving devices to interest householders, and presents conclusive evidence that postwar shortages no longer exist in such a recently scarce items as metal stripping, tile, garage doors and kitchen appliances.

In addition to the improvements shown in plumbing, heating, insulating and air-conditioning units, this year's show stresses items contributing to beauty and comfort in larger windows, colorful bathrooms and kitchens, and the use of formica and micarta for table tops and working surfaces.

Evening visitors to the exhibit will be entertained by barbershop quartets chosen by competition from the local membership of SPEBSQUA, and a vaudeville skit starring the Grab brothers.
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UR President To Give Talk

At an all-University convocation Wednesday morning in the Eastman Theater, celebrating the opening of the University of Rochester's centennial year, President Al[?]n Valentine will give his first major talk on his experience as chief of the Marshall Plan mission to the Netherlands the past year.

The convocation will begin at 10 a. m., and all other University activities will be suspended that morning to enable students, faculty and staffs of the UR's various schools and colleges to attend. Extra buses will leave the River Campus and Medical Center loops between 9:13 and 9:30 o'clock to take them to the Eastman Theater.

Earnest A. Paviour, chairman of the University's Centennial Committee, will outline the plans for special centennial observance in 1950. Paviour is a UR trustee, and an alumnus in the class of 1910.

To Review history

Dr. John R. Slater, emeritas professor of English and author of the biography of Dr. Rush Rhees, president of the University from 1900-1935, " Rhees of Rochester," will review the University's distinguished history since its founding in 1850.

The Rev. Charles R. Stinnette Jr., chaplain of the College of Arts and Science, will give the invocation.

The ceremonies will begin with the academic per session from Kilbourn Hall into Eastman Theater, with members of the faculties of the College of Arts and Science, the Eastman School of Music, Medical School, Graduate School, and University School taking part.

Chorus To Sing

Under the direction of Dr. Herman H. Genhart, the Eastman School Chorus of 200 voices will sing the "Commencement Hymn" composed by professor Slater, and the UR Alma Mater, "The Genesee."

In his address, President Valentine, who returned to the University last month after a year's leave of absence to head the Economic Cooperation Administration program in the Netherlands, will give some of his conclusions on the conflicting forces at work in Europe, and what the European Recovery Plan's contribution has been in trying to solve some of the problems of economic recovery, political stability, and spiritual regeneration.
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Woman, 2 Men Hurt In 2-Car Collision

Three persons were hurt in a collision of automobiles at Maple and Saxton Sts., shortly before 5 p. m. yesterday. Phyllis Stollery, 20, passenger in a car driven by Arthur Stollery, 20, her husband, of 86 Steko Ave., was hurt on the head and leg. She was taken to Genesee hospital. Stohler was cut on the lip and left thumb. Charles Turpin, 33, of 456 Oxford St., passenger in a car driven by Frederick Sietmann, 26, of 20 Boardman St., was hurt on the back and neck. He was taken to Strong Memorial Hospital.
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Falls Off Ladder

When he lost his balance and fell 12 feet from a ladder on which he was working putting up storm windows at about 11:30 a. m. yesterday, Edward Roesser, 58, of 68 Middlesex Rd., suffered body bruises. He was taken to Genesee
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[[caption]] Daniel G. Kennedy, Reporter for a Day, does his stint in observance of Newspaper Week. Seen above, he's 'batting out' his story on assignment which he 'covered' yesterday.
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Hard Receives GAR Promotion

James A. Hard, 106 years old, is a junior.
Junior vicecommander-in-chief of the Grand Army of the Republic, that is.

Hard, the nations oldest Civil War Veteran, was appointed to the office by Commander-in-Chief Theodore A. Penland of Portland, Ore.

The appointment resulted from the death on Sept. 19 of Charles A. Chappel of California, senior vice-commander who was succeeded by Alfred Woolson of Minnesota. Hard takes over Woolson's post of junior vice commander.
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Shrine Club to Hear Pioneer Woman Flyer
Miss Blanche Scott, the first woman to fly in the United States and the second to fly in the world, will speak at the Damascus Shrine luncheon meeting tomorrow noon at the Powers Hotel.
Ward Turner, president of the Shrine Luncheon Club, who will preside, said this is the first time the club has had a feminine speaker. XX
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Youth held for Forging

Robert J Shine, 17, of 27 Oregon St., was arrested yesterday morning by detectives Anthony Biondi and Frank Hohman on charges of second degree forgery and petit larceny.  Police said Shine stole a Monroe County welfare check belonging to Lou Edna Peck, of the same address on Sept, 2, forged an endorsement and cashed it.
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Chemists Hear Talk On Drugs

The development of new drugs for the relief of epilepsy was described here last night by Dr. Ernest H. Volwiler, president-elect of the American Chemical Society.

Dr. Volwiler, who is research director of the Abbot Laboratories of Chicago, Ill., spoke at a meeting of the Rochester area sections of the society at the Powers Hotel.  A tour of Kodak Park and of the cyclotron building at the University of Rochester preceded the dinner.

The epileptic control drugs offer no cure for the affliction, Dr. Volwiler pointed out, but they do give patients effective relief. He said they were superior to drugs previously used in epilepsy control.

Dr. Volwiler also commented on the recent discovery of cortisone, or Compound E, the new "wonder" drug which eliminates the pain of rheumatic arthritis. He said the drug which cannot yet be produced on a large scale is still in the experimental stages and has not been fully tested. (For other news about new arthritis drugs, see Page 6A.)

The several 100 society members who attended the dinner meeting also saw slides prepared by Dr. Volwiler to show the structure of various new drugs. The Rochester, Syracuse, Cornell University and Binghamton sections of society participated in the meeting.

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[[right margin]] Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, Sunday, October 2, 1949 [/right margin]]

 



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