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The World's First Lady Bird


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By SIDNEY FIELDS

At 18 Blanche Stuart Scott became the first woman in the world to pilot a plane. That was in 1910.
A couple years ago she took a ride in a huge B-52, piloted a Cessna, and in 1946 went up in a jet with Chuck Yeager, the boy who first broke the sound barrier.
With 41 mended bones in her body, this indestructible Early Bird is about five-foot-two (on her toes), and has the mental and physical muscle of a girl half her years. She'd like to take a crack at flying in a rocket plane, but has no desire to go to the moon.

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"I think we ought to leave the moon to the songwriters and lovers," she says. "We've enough to do here on earth."
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She's now a widow and has 

[[image - a woman on a plane]]
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'MERRY HELL' FOR FIRST FLIGHT
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no children, for which she's grateful.

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"I can't control a cat or dog," she says, "so what would I do with a child? God in his infinite wisdom gave me three husbands, but no children. If i had a son he'd probably be a delinquent."
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SHE WAS AN only child, and her father, who had a big patent medicine business in Rochester, N.Y., brought her up on the theme: "Are you right? If you're sure, give 'em hell."

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"Now, that's no way to bring up a kid," she says. "My mother said that I kept telling people to go to hell all my life."
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At 13 she had her own car. Before she was 18 she became the first woman to drive across the country. When she returned, a reluctant Glenn H. Curtiss was persuaded to teach her flying; reluctant because if she

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cracked up it would set aviation back 100 years.

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"In those days planes were wire, bamboo, pine, and a motor that sounded like a whirling bold in a dish pan," she says. "He put me in it, explained this and that, and you got familiar with this and that going along the ground, grass cutting, and then hopping, a short take-off and quick landing."
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After a week of such instruction and practice she just took off, stayed up to 60 to 70 feet for three minutes at a speed of over 50 miles an hour.

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"up there I was so busy I didn't feel anything," she says. "Once down, I told myself: 'I've done it! But Mr. Curtiss is going to give me merry hell.' He did too. He hadn't given me permission to fly."
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FOR THE NEXT six years she, and the 75 men flying then, did well as exhibition flyers around the country. She cracked up only twice. Her 41 mended bones bother her? 

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"Never. They don't even tell me when the weather is going to change."
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She quit stunt flying because there was no more big money in it, the novelty had waned, and the First World War was coming on.
She wrote for the movies for 11 years, was a radio commentator, the assistant manager of a radio station, and then the Air Force hired her as special consultant for their Museum at the Wright-Patterson Base, a job she held until 1956.

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"The budget dropped and so did I," she says. "But I got the museum $1,250,000 worth of precious historical material. I'm one of the world's best chiselers."
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She thought she'd loaf her old farmhouse in Hornell, N.Y. But he got restless, went

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ONLY HUMAN 
[[image - BLANCHE SCOTT]]

around the country, around Europe. No good.
THE EARLY BIRDS appointed her Chairman of the Curtiss Memorial Committee, and she's raising a little money for a granite monument and bronze plaque to Glenn H. Curtiss for his part in aviation. It will be erected at Hammondsport, N.Y., where he taught her to fly.
Wherever she goes to raise the money she hammers at young men to join the Air Force as a bright career. But such efforts aren't enough for a lively kid like Scott.

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"To shelve a healthy man or woman just because they're 65 is stupid," she says. "That's wasting brains we need very badly. What happens to people who retire? They live a year or two and die."
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Does she need money?
"No. I have enough to live on, though i'm an extravagant wench. But when I quit working I get itches, aches and pains. I need a job for my health. I can't retire. I've too many things I want to do."

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WASHINGTON
MERRY-GO-ROUND
Reds Grab Latin Plum

By DREW PEARSON
WASHINGTON, Jan. 19-It's pure accident that President Arturo Frondizi of Argentina arrives in Washington just as Soviet Deputy Premier Mikoyan is leaving. Both men are interested in trade.
It was not pure accident, however, that Mikoyan's cohorts got to Argentina ahead of the United States and copped one of the biggest trade plums recently negotiated with Argentina. 

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Last Fall the Soviet negotiated a $100 million deal with Frondizi whereby Argentina buys Russian oil machinery and uses Russian technicians to install it. This is a field in which the USA hitherto has been supreme.
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Following this, the United States belatedly gave Argentina a $329 million credit to offset the Russian coup. To further offset it, we invited Frondizi to Washington.
Here are some things you may not know about the President of Argentina. 

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He was the thirteenth child of Italian immigrants. Frondizi dcided to make this lucky. He almost became a Communist, was a great student of Karl Marx, refused to accept his law degree because it was to be presented by a military dictator. Frondizi has battled dictators most of his life, including exdictator Peron.
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IT WAS TO attend the Frondizi inauguration that Vice President Nixon went to South America last year. 

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He missed Frondizi's swearing-in ceremony by several minutes, but no stones were hurled at him in Argentina. They came later in Peru and Venezuela.
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Frondizi is a serious, unsmiling figure who has instituted a program of austerity far stricter than that of Deputy Premier Mikoyan in Russia.
He determined to balance the argentine economy, is taxing luxuries right and left, curbing imports, but promises to get a stable, democratic regime back in the saddle in Argentina. His visited is an important step in solidifying our neglected good neighbor policy.

Washington Pipeline
Farm leaders say Nelson Rockefeller has made his first political mistake as Governor of New York. He appointed Don Wickham, president of the New York Farm Bureau, to be his Commissioner of Agriculture. If Nelson is seriously thinking about running for President he should have checked on the fact that Wickham supported Benson's farm policies right down the line, and Benson has won more votes for Democrats in the midwest than any other man... Sen. Frank Moss of Utah was one of only two Rocky Mountain Senators who stood firm on the filibuster flight. The Rocky Mountain area is strong for civil rights, but all of its Senators deserted to the southern coalition except John Carroll of Colorado and, on some votes Allott of Colorado with Clinton Anderson of New Mexico.
([[copyright symbol]] 1959, by The Beli Syndicate, Inc.)

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VICTOR RIESEL: INSIDE LABOR
Hoffa Shooting for the 'Moon'

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CAPE CANAVERAL, Jan. 19. - It was natural that "moon-shooting" would fascinate Jim Hoffa. Now he's adding outerspace to his jurisdiction. But he's starting from the ground up here. For weeks some of his toughest organizers have been around this boom down territory signing up the 325 "stock clerks." They are the men who keep track of and nurse the big rockets from the moment of arrival Patrick Air Force Base until they are tenderly placed on the launching pads for blast off.

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Those clerks are employes of the Pan-American Guided Missiles Range Division. If they finally do get into some terrestrial Teamster local, their leader will be Joe Morgan, with whom the McClellan Committee had some difficulty. Morgan is the Teamster General Organizer in these parts. He controls three Florida locals and has filed with the National Mediation Board for the official recognition of the rocket stock clerks as Teamster members.
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The first stage of this story goes back to a Senate racketbusting committee hearing in December, 1957. Brother Morgan was on the witness stand. This

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fellow who has been holding mass meetings of Cape Canaveral workers refused even to tell the committee whether he held office in the Teamsters. Nor would he deny knowledge of violence. His silence finally provoked Sen. Carl Curtis to ask:

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"Is it an established program and policy of the union to organize the unorganized by shootings, beatings, dynamiting places and burning up property?"
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The record shows that Morgan, organizer at our most sensitive rocket base, replied:

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"I claim my constitutional right not to be forced to be a witness against myself."
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COMMITTEE COUNSELOR
Bob Kennedy asked Morgan, who is an official of Florida Teamster Local 390, to tell him about the local's former president, one Ernie Belles.This is important because Morgan today is using Local 390 as the official base for his operations at this rocket center.
Kennedy told the Senators that Belles was formerly head of Buffalo Teamster Local 375. He was ousted by the rank-and-file. The members took it as a


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personal insult that $38,500 was missing from the union's treasury.
Counsel Kennedy turned to Sen. McClellan, and said: 

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"Mr. Chairman, I would like to say on Mr. Belles that we had this information that he was involved in the embezzlement of this $37,00 or $38,000."
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McClellan, with dripping disdain, asked how it could be that an official involved in such activity in one union local could go down and become "a big shot in another."

IT MAY BE coincidence, but the fellow who had been fighting Belles in Buffalo later took over found dynamite under the hood of his car. So Belles went to Florida, became president of local 390, was fought again, and was ousted by the rank-and-file here, too. But-Morgan then made him an organizer for the local, which now is moving into the rocket base.

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The Teamster who had the courage to fight Belles in Florida was ousted from the local. He just had no respect for the union's type of noblesse oblige.
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This, then, is the local which now wants official government certification for the Air Force outer space ground units.

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[[image - headshot of JOE MORGAN]]
[[caption]]
JOE MORGAN
Leader of 'Moon-Men'
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They are about one-third of the full crew which accounts for the rocket logistics and run the medical corps and fire-fighting sections. Teamster officials have said they would go after hundreds of other Pan-American workers once they sign up the stock clerks. They have set a Feb. 1 deadline. They want a quick settlement. They don't want any dragged out hearings before the Mediation Board or negotiations with Pan-Am.

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Moon-shooting certainly isn't going to get in the way of Hoffa's organizing. The stars can wait.
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COMIC DICTIONARY
Misanthrope: A man who has little faith in mankind, and even less in womankind. 
Bore: A person who uses his mouth to talk while you use yours to yawn.

SPOTLIGHT PAGE
NEW YORK MIRROR, TUESDAY, JANUARY 20, 1959

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