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                       RHW:R

                                 October 13th, 1937

Dear Mrs. Dillman:

     I ran into Hugh a couple of days ago on the Avenue--very dapper and terribly busy interviewing orchestras and looking after other preparations for the coming Palm Beach season. Nevertheless, I succeeded in pinning him down at least to one cocktail and to get all the news of you and your trip out west. I can well understand that you must have had quite an exciting and strenuous time, and do hope that everything passed over nicely and that you are well and in good spirits.

     Chatting about this and that, I told Hugh that I am again back in the art game, and he told me that you were building a house in England.

     Of course, I realize that I cannot compete with your friend, Lord Duveen, but I would greatly appreciate it if you would consider me a little, and give me whatever business you see fit. It would mean a great deal to me especially now at the return of the Prodigal Son.

     I have one item that perhaps could interest you greatly, as it is of unusually good taste, and could make a room absolutely unique. We have, in Paris, six magnificent panneaux, carved wood on a dull golden background, executed after cartoons by Clodion by order of Queen Marie Antoinette of France. In all probability these panneaux were placed in one of the Queen's chateaux which was burned down during the revolution. There are very similar panneaux still in the Apartements de la Reine in Versailles. During the Napoleonic days, it is believed and stands to reason--by the Empress Marie-Louise who was an Austrian Arch-Duchess--these panneaux were brought to Austria, as we purchased them from the Administration of the former Imperial Family.

     The gilding of the golden background is magnificently soft and mellow and has been applied to the wood with stencils of various designs.

     I have a set of photographs here which I would like very much to have you see, if you would kindly let me know where I can send them, should you at all be interested. But enough for today of business matters.


t.s.v.p.
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