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126   THE CRISIS ADVERTISER


KNOXVILLE COLLEGE
Beautiful Situation. Healthful Location. Best Moral and Spiritual Environment. Splendid Intellectual Atmosphere. Noted for Honest and Thorough Work.

Institution offers full courses in the following departments: College, Normal, High School, Grammar School, Domestic Science and Industrial.

Good water, steam heat, electric lights, natural drainage, splendid dormitories. Expenses very reasonable.

For catalog and other information address
PRESIDENT J. KELLY GIFFEN
Knoxville, Tenn.



WILEY UNIVERSITY
MARSHALL, TEXAS

Recognized as a college of the First Class by Texas and Louisiana State Boards of Education. Harvard, Yale and Columbia represented on its faculty; students gathered from ten different states.

Strongest Music Department in the West

M. W. DOGAN, President



COLEMAN COLLEGE
GIBSLAND, LA.

Supported by Baptist State Woman's Home Mission Society of Chicago and Boston and A. B. H. Society of New York. Students from six different states. Graduates exempted on first grade by Louisiana, Arkansas and Oklahoma.

O. L. COLEMAN, President




THE A. & T. COLLEGE SUMMER SCHOOL

THE TWENTIETH ANNUAL SESSION will begin June 16th, and continue for six weeks. In addition to the courses for teachers of academic subjects, strong courses will be given for teachers of Agriculture, Manual Training, Domestic Art, Raffia and Basketry.

The following noted institutions are represented on the faculty:
Harvard
Columbia
Cornell
Chicago
Howard 
Union
Atlanta
Fisk
Drexel Ins. 
Hampton Ins.
Myrtilla Minor Normal School
Armour Institute of Technology
Ithaca Conservatory of Music
Pratt Institute
A. & T. College

Summer School Bulletins are sent on request

Every modern sanitary convenience can be found in the commodious dormitories. Bath rooms with showers and tubs are situated on every floor.

For further information address
PREST. DUDLEY
A. & T. Summer School
GREENSBORO, N. C.



The Slater Industrial and State Normal School
For Colored Youth of Both Sexes
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C.

I. Offering Standard Courses
In Academic Subjects
In Industrial and Vocational Subjects, 
In Education.

II. Graduates receive the Teachers' Certificate.

III. Located amid the foothills of the mountain section of Western North Carolina and the health conditions are ideal.

IV. Accommodations excellent and expenses moderate.

For further information communicate with 
S. G. ATKINS, Principal
SLATER STATE NORMAL SCHOOL,
Winston-Salem, N. C.



Lincoln University

Beginning September 22, 1919, the requirement for admission to the Theological Department will be graduation from a College of Liberal Arts. Young Men wishing to prepare for the Ministry in a Seminary, all whose resources will henceforth be devoted to the education of the adequately trained alone, are invited to write to 

President, John B. Rendall
Lincoln University P. O., Pennsylvania.



THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
TALLAHASSEE - - - FLORIDA
NATHAN B. YOUNG, President

DEPARTMENTS:

I. Academic
a. High School.
b. Normal School.
c. College.
d. Music.

2. Agricultural.
a. General.
b. Vocational.

3. Mechanic Arts
a. Technical.
b. Vocational.

4. Home Economics
a. Domestic Arts. 
b. Domestic Science.
c. Nurse-Training.

EQUIPMENT: 
I. 250 Acres.
2. 21 Buildings.
3. 42 Officers of Instruction and Administration.


(Educational Institutions
Continued on page 156)

Mention THE CRISIS


THE CRISIS

Vol. 18  No. 3  JULY, 1919  Whole No. 105

[[image: with in the initial O of the following word, a line drawing of a shining lit candle in candlestick standing on an open book]] Opinion 
of W.E.B. Du Bois

CLEVELAND
ON to Cleveland this last week of June. Ten years we have fought, up-hill and down, amid execration and applause, steadily onward and forward. We are today a great organization, with all the pitfalls and temptations of size and strength. One thing alone will keep and guide us to vaster size and irresistible power: the human touch—the personal acquaintanceship, the cordial sympathy of those who meet face to face and put hand in hand.

Our danger is space. We stretch from the Atlantic to the Pacific and from the St. Lawrence to the Panama Canal. Let us continually get together. Let us be ever meeting and meeting again, knowing each other, getting the inspiration of personal contact in local and state meetings, in regional conferences, in national conferences, like this great Cleveland meeting. There is Strength in Unity, but in Knowledge there is Freedom.

OUR SUCCESS AND FAILURE
THE facts are these: We fought and worked on the Western Front, 200,000 strong under a thousand black officers; we helped to crush the most serious obstacle to the modern democratic movement since Napoleon Bonaparte; we gained the sympathy and respect of France and the civilized world—and what is more, we gained a new self-respect and a new consciousness of power.

Despite all this great success, we made one serious blunder and lest in the future we repeat this mistake, let us look it now full in the face and seek to understand it:

During the draft and the period of cantonment training the whole consciousness and intelligence of the race stood on the firing line; we relentlessly discovered, exposed and fought discrimination. We did not wholly remove it, but we did overcome much and, above all, we knew the essential facts. We suffered with open eyes.

Mr. Emmett J. Scott, as Special Assistant to the Secretary of War, became gradually our mouthpiece for complaint and intermediary for redress. It was difficult work. Considering the discriminations of the draft law, the prejudice of the South and North and the Espionage Act, Mr. Scott seemed to be doing as well as anyone could expect under the circumstances. THE CRISIS noted this, gave him every public and private aid and thanked him for his efforts. Mr. Scott several times expressed similar appreciation and once wrote the editor, on the occasion of the proposed special bureau in the War Department, as follows:

Dear Dr. DuBois:

Except for the fact that for the past few weeks I have been unusually hard-pressed for time, I should have sooner written you regarding a number of matters. I am writing now particularly to express my personal regret that the Sub-Section of the M. I. B., which 

127
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