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"Hew to the Line"

To-day as never before the
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People
needs the support of every American who believes in law and order.

We appeal to every right thinking white man and woman to support our fight for the legal rights of the Negro. If our method of legal and constitutional means fails, only chaos can follow.

To every colored man and woman we say - Stand firm! American public opinion will rally to our cause, which is America's cause, if all the forces for justice can be organized to fight together.

If sectional difficulties hinder our advance, we will not retreat!

In every legitimate, lawful way we are going to fight. The harder the opposition, the firmer will be our stand. Lynchings and race riots do not cause us to fear. They only make us more determined to fight on and on until all injustice and violence based on color prejudice is done away with - never to return.

While the present may seem dark to some, the future has never been so bright.

"Hew to the Line, let the chips fall where they may"
                    
Join the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People
which strives by every legitimate and lawful means to "Make Eleven Million Americans Physically Free From Peonage, Mentally Free from Ignorance, Politically Free from Disfranchisement and Socially Free from Insult."


Date ___________ 1919

The CRISIS is sent without further charge to members paying two dollars and fifty cents or more. 

Joel E. Spingarn, Acting Treasurer,
  70 Fifth Avenue, New York,

SIR:
   I enclose $_________ in payment of membership dues for one year in the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, stipulating that one dollar and fifty cents of any amount remitted herewith in excess of one dollar is for one year's subscription to THE CRISIS.

     Name_____________
        Street__________________
           City and State___________________


National Officers
MOORFIELD STOREY, President

Vice-Presidents
ARCHIBALD GRIMKE
REV. JOHN HAYNES HOLMES
BISHOP JOHN HURST
CAPT. ARTHUR B. SPINGARN
OSWALD GARRISON VILLARD

Executive Officers

Chairman of the Board
MARY WHITE OVINGTON

JOHN R. SHILLADY, Secretary
Major J.E. SPINGARN, Acting Treas.
DR. W.E.B. DU BOIS, Director of Publications and Research
JAMES W. JOHNSON, Field Sec'y
WALTER F. WHITE, Assistant Sec'y

70 Fifth Auenue, New York City



THE CRISIS
A RECORD OF THE DARKER RACES

PUBLISHED MONTHLY AND COPYRIGHTED BY THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF COLORED PEOPLE AT 70 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK CITY. CONDUCTED BY W. E. BURGHARDT DU BOIS; JESSIE REDMON FAUCET, LITERARY EDITOR; AUGUSTUS GRANVILLE DILL, BUSINESS MANAGER.

Vol. 19 - No. 1 NOVEMBER, 1919 Whole No. 109


PICTURES 
- Page

COVER. Photograph by Battey.

THE HONORABLE C.D.B. King, Secretary of State and President-elect of Liberia, and Mrs. King - 342

THE DECORATED COLORS OF THE FRENCH COLONIAL TROOPS - 346


ARTICLES

THE HOPE OF A NEGRO DRAMA. Willis Richardson - 338

A LETTER - 339


DEPARTMENTS

OPINION - 335

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF COLORED PEOPLE - 340

MEN OF THE MONTH - 341

THE LOOKING GLASS - 343

THE HORIZON - 346


COMING ISSUES OF THE CRISIS

The December CRISIS will be our annual Christmas Number, with its cover in colors and holiday cheer.


TEN CENTS A COPY; ONE DOLLAR A YEAR

FOREIGN SUBSCRIPTIONS TWENTY-FIVE CENTS EXTRA

RENEWALS: The date of expiration of each subscription is printed on the wrapper. When the subscription is due, a blue renewal blank is enclosed.

CHANGE OF ADDRESS: The address of the subscriber can be changed as often as desired. In ordering a change of address, both the old and the new address must be given. Two weeks' notice is required.

MANUSCRIPTS and drawings relating to colored people are desired. They must be accompanied by return postage. If found unavailable they will be returned.

Entered as second class matter November 2, 1910, at the post office at New York, New York, under the Act of March 3, 1879.

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