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266    THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 


LIVINGSTONE COLLEGE
SALISBURY, N.C.

A Religious Co-Educational School with a Tradition

Open to All Negroes: Only Merit Counts
  
Students come from Twenty-nine States in the Union, from Canada, Africa, the West India Islands and Central America. And Graduates Make Good.
 
Salisbury, North Carolina, an Ideal Place for Study with a Mild, Equable Climate, Pure Water, Breezes from Pine and other Forests a Constant Tonic — the Greatest Degree of Healthfulness.

New Girls' Dormitory with all Modern Conveniences Accommodating 210 just Completed and Ready

Courses of Study: Grammar School, Academy, Normal, College, Divinity, Music and Industries for Boys and Girls.

Expenses Moderate.

Thirty-sixth Session Opened Wednesday, October 3, 1917.

For further Information Address
D. C. Suggs, President or J. E. Aggrey, Registrar.



TOUGALOO COLLEGE
MISSISSIPPI

"The best school for Negroes in the State."— Bishop Theodore D. Bratton.

COLLEGE
Regular Four Year A. B. Course 
Two Year Teacher Training Course

ACADEMY
Choice of Seven Courses — College Preparatory, Agricultural, Mechanical, Home Economics, Commercial, Pedagogical, Musical.

Out in the country. Expenses low.

Four Prize Scholarships of $25.00 Each Offered Boys for Best Entrance Examinations to Eighth and Ninth Grade.

For particulars
Write President W. T. HOLMES
Tougaloo, Hinds County, Mississippi



Hale Infirmary and Nurse Training School
328 Lake Street, Montgomery, Alabama.

Hale Infirmary School of Nursing offers to intelligent young women between the age of eighteen and thirty-five a three years' course in the profession of nursing. Students of this school are eligible to Alabama examinations for the degree of R. N. For further information apply to the superintendent.



Talladega College
TALLADEGA, ALABAMA
FREDERICK A. SUMNER, President.

A School for Training Leaders through the following Departments and Courses:

Scientific        
Classical           
Education         
Theological
Bible Institute 
Academy
Conservatory of Music
Agriculture
Domestic Science and Arts
Nurse Training
Manual Training
Printing

40 Teachers and Workers
600 Students

For Catalog address,
THE DEAN, Talladega College, Talladega, Ala.



COLEMAN COLLEGE
GIBSLAND, LA.

Supported by Baptist State Woman's Home Mission Society of Chicago and Boston and A. B. H. Society of New York. Students from six different states. Graduates exempted on first grade by Louisiana, Arkansas and Oklahoma.

O.L. COLEMAN, President



The Slater Industrial and State Normal School
For Colored Youth of Both Sexes
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C.

I. Offering Standard Courses
In Academic Subjects,
In Industrial and Vocational Subjects,
In Education.

II. Graduates receive the Teacher's Certificate.

III. Located amid the foothills of the mountain section of Western North Carolina and the health conditions are ideal.

IV. Accommodations excellent and expenses moderate.

For further information communicate with 
S. G. ATKINS, Principal
SLATER STATE NORMAL SCHOOL,
Winston-Salem, N.C.



THE LINCOLN HOSPITAL AND HOME SCHOOL FOR NURSES

in the City of New York offers to young women a three years' course of instruction in Nursing. Capacity of hospital 420 beds. Post Graduate course of six months to graduates of accredited training schools. For information apply to SUPERINTENDENT of NURSES, Lincoln Hospital and Home, New York City.



The Colored Teachers' Bureau

Will Help You Get A Better Paying Position.
REGISTER NOW REASONABLE TERMS

Address: Colored Teachers' Bureau
Box 22, Wilberforce, O.


Mention THE CRISIS



THE CRISIS
Vol. 15 - No.6 April, 1918 Whole No. 90

Editorial


LEAD, KINDLY LIGHT

IT IS just an old lantern, filled with grimy oil. It cannot lead anywhere, yet its light leads. Its golden light streams throughout the night.

Whose is the light?

It is not the lantern's. It simply seems to be the lantern's radiance. It is the Light of the World and it leads not toward the millenium in the North, but out of the insult and prostitution and ignorance and lies and lynchings of the South - up toward a chance, a new chance, - nothing more. But thank God for that.

The United States Department of Labor has been doing all it can to put this light out. Long since it stopped helping Negroes to find jobs in the North. Lately it has forbidden firms from advertising for southern labor. More lately it has begun what may prove a new slavery of 100,000 workers from the West Indies.

We have asked for justice from this Department of the Government; we have asked not for jobs but for representation with power; the answer lingers.

Lead, Kindly Light.


ONE HUNDRED THOUSAND

WE ARE publishing 100,000 copies of the Easter CRISIS and indications are that we shall sell the whole edition. 

This is no small physical accomplishment. End to end these copies would extend fifteen miles and the pages end to end would reach from Boston to Baltimore. The weight of the edition sent through the mails will be nearly ten tons.

And yet, this is but a fair beginning. It is not too much to ask for one million readers of THE CRISIS and toward this we are aiming.

Meantime, there comes the insistent and proper question: "Why does not THE CRISIS do its own printing and presswork?"

The answer is: We shall at the first possible moment. But it must be remembered that to print a magazine of this quality and circulation would call for an expenditure of capital larger than we can now afford. Nevertheless, we have already taken steps looking toward a future when we shall not only manufacture and publish THE CRISIS, but do a general publishing business.

The income of THE CRISIS last year was nearly $33,000. Half of this was spent in publishing and over $9,000 in salaries. THE CRISIS is still out of debt with a net worth December 31, 1917, of $8,586.

Thank you.


ATTENTION.

FIELD ARTILLERY has become a highly specialized instrument of great precision. Front line trenches are frequently less than a hundred yards apart and nothing discourages your own infantry more than to receive a shell that was intended for the next trench. When the men of the 92nd Division go "over the top" they will frequently follow an accompanying barrage as close as a hundred yards.

Now that "curtain of fire" behind which colored soldiers will move to

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