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214 THE CRISIS ADVERTISER


1870 CLARK UNIVERSITY 1917
SOUTH ATLANTA GEORGIA

Most beautiful campus of 70 acres, commodious buildings with modern conveniences. High Scholarship - Talented Faculty - Well equipped library and laboratories - Literary societies - Athletics - Co-educational - Expenses very low. $100 per year of eight months will pay tuition, board, room, etc.

Comfortable dormitories with steam heat and gas light.

COURSES OF STUDY
Domestic Science for girls, cooking, sewing, dressmaking and embroidery.
Pre-Academy - 7th and 8th grades.
Pre-Medical - Two years above academy.
College - Four years leading to A. B. degree.
Normal - Five years above grades with diploma.

First Semester opens October 3, 1917.

HARRY ANDREWS KING, President.



THE WEST VIRGINIA COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE
NEAR CHARLESTON, W. VA.

One of the leading schools in the United States for the education of Negro youth. Healthful surroundings, fine dormitory facilities, expenses low, strong faculty.

For catalog address
BYRD PRILLERMAN, A. M. Pres., Institute, W. Va.



THE FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
Tallahassee, Florida

Offers long and short courses in Mechanic Arts, in Home Economics, in Agriculture, in Education and in Science.

For Catalog Address
NATHAN B. YOUNG, President
P. O. DRAWER 524



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL

An Episcopal boarding school for girls, under the direction of the Sisters of St. Mary. 

Address: 
THE SISTER-IN-CHARGE
609 N. 43rd St. W. Philadelphia, Pa.



HARTSHORN MEMORIAL COLLEGE
RICHMOND, VIRGINIA

A superior school for the separate, higher education of young women. Select Courses of study, Industrial, Music, Preparatory, Classical, Normal and College. Provides a pleasant home, careful culture and thorough training.

Expenses very moderate.
Send for Catalog to the President.


1867 HOWARD UNIVERSITY 1917

Stephen M. Newman, A. M., D. D., President.

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
A. B. and B. S. COURSES

TEACHERS' COLLEGE
A. B. and B. S. Courses in Education

SCHOOL OF MANUAL ARTS AND
APPLIED SCIENCES
B. S. Courses in Engineering, Home Economics, Manual Arts.

CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC
Mus. B. Courses

ACADEMY
Two Preparatory Courses:
Classical, Scientific

COMMERCIAL COLLEGE
Secretarial Course, Accounting Course, General Course.

LIBRARY TRAINING CLASS

PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS

SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY
B. D. Courses, Diploma Course.

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE
M. D. Courses in Medicine, D. D. S. Courses in Dentistry, Phar. D. Courses in Pharmacy.

SCHOOL OF LAW
LL. B. Courses

For catalog, address:
HOWARD UNIVERSITY, Washington, D. C.


Educational Institutions continued on page 266.

Mention THE CRISIS



THE CRISIS

Vol. 14 - No. 5 SEPTEMBER, 1917 Whole No. 83


Editorial

THE WORLD LAST MONTH.

THESE are days of confusion and contradiction. — Russia reacts from her ecstasy of last spring and retreats spent and demoralized. Will the blood and iron methods of Kerensky be able to reinvigorate her? — The new German Chancellor Michaelis offers peace terms which no one can or will accept. — The Great War drags on in definitely. — Congress keeps America from doing her bit. — In the name of world democracy we land black soldiers in France to fight for our white allies, while white soldiers in East St. Louis kill black Americans for daring to compete in the world of labor with their white fellowmen. — China see-saws again from a monarchy to a republic and by her declaration of war adds to the world's embroilment. — Out of all this chaos and confusion calm and readjustment must finally come. But no man can guess when or how.


MORE SUGGESTIONS.

We spoke last month of the great call for team work on the part of American Negroes and the pressing necessity of turning that team work toward helping us to earn a living.

Today the way is open for co-operation among 12,000,000 people on a scale such as we have never dreamed. What we can do is shown in little things. Ten thousand of us marched the other day in New York City. Everybody said it could not be done. The ways were lined with rabbits, afraid even to walk for freedom, and yet, solemnly and simply, the Negroes of New York told the other citizens of New York their grief and resentment. That is but a little thing. We can do infinitely more. We can organize for industrial co-operation and we can begin with co-operation in distribution. In every large city where 10,000 or more Negroes live, the business of buying groceries, food, clothing and fuel can, by a single determined effort, be put into the hands of colored people. This kind of distribution has been successful all over the world. Little is said about it because the leeches that have fattened on retail trade are too powerful with the newspapers. Distribution of the necessities of life can be easily done was a tremendous saving to the people and the employment of colored men and women. The only thing necessary is for us to start; and to start we simply require that the same spirit of devotion and sacrifice, coupled with brains and training, that has sent young men and women to the ministry and to the Y.M. and Y.W.C.A. work should be turned now among us Negroes and be put into business.

White people are not in business for their health. We should be in business for our health and for the health of the world.


EAST ST. LOUIS.

Let no one fear that in the economic development of the American Negro East St. Louis is not a bubble. Its significance is simply the shame of American democracy and the other impotence of its justice. Neverthe- [[Nevertheless]]
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