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WASHINGTON GLIDER CLUB
WASHINGTON 
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

ERNEST W. SPINK          JOHN J. GORMAN
PRESIDENT                FIRST VICE-PRESIDENT

PAUL EDWARD GARBER       L.J MARHOEFFER
SECRETARY-TREASURY       SECOND VICE-PRESIDENT

                        August 5, 1930. 

Mrs. Lt. Ralph Barnaby, 
2303 - 28th St., N.W., 
Washington, D.C. 

Dear Member: 

The Washington Gliding Club is passing thru an experience that gliding clubs all over the world seem to have regardless of all efforts to correct it, and your Executive Committee thinks that a statement of facts should be presented to each member in writing. 

Out of our total membership scarcely one-third are flying regularly and over one-half have never even taken their slides. A recent report covering all of the recognized gliding clues of the United States disclosed the fact than an average of only 31% of the total membership had ever attempted flight. We are therefore above the average, but the situation is not ideal and we wish to make our club a model for all others to pattern after. 

The members of our club have collectively made over three hundred successful flights, but of these ten members only a few are flying with the degree of regularity necessary for progressive training. Intermittent and irregular flights are of very little value; for the student loses between times all of the "feel of the air" he has previously acquired. 

These few who are flying regularly will soon be using the secondary ships and will then be spending their Sundays in the mountains taking longer flights. Those members who have lagged behind will then be at a serious disadvantage in operating the primary ship due to lack of full and experiences crews. The advanced members cannot be asked to help others who would not apply themselves regularly when they should have. We. are flying every Sunday from 10 A.M. on, and every member who isn't there when his turn comes drops just that much behind. 
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