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Soaring (not War..ing) in 1940's    Page 4 1/2    Hattie Meyers Junkin

There were Distributors in many States who came in to fly their Waco Nines back to use privately and/or for advertising, training aviators and just a happy way of healthy orientation.

Sam was planning an all metal Waco..a cabin job. Soon after his return from getting the last of the OX5's from Horace Dodge, he had a heart attack. After seven months in bed he died of endocarditus [[endocarditis]]. Our little daughter was seven weeks old.

My vehicle of "peace" was pushing the baby buggy, I was grounded. In aviation we say, "Any crash is a good landing if you can walk away from it." Buck dead at 29, Sam at 30. **********

I was out of my world, so was my little "Buck" Weaver. To find that needed lang slant.. that something I believe anyone who flies finds. The Finns call it Sisu, a young engineer told me. Someone aptly wrote, "to continue to get the better of bad fortune by showing we could stand more?"

The Roaring Twenties found the names Laird, Stinson, WACO the new young builders flown into posterity. Aviators no longer called "Sissies" for using the new equipment, a parachute. They were members of the "Caterpillar club," once onced. The Quiet Birdmen, Q.B's with many who were not. 1929 mergers, the falsifiers, like a world changing to think anything could be brought even honor. Dollars riding the crest of the waves..unhealthy trend in human mores...Embassies suspect..came the German youths to America with their gliders These gliders were primitive in material and needs.
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