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LEDO BLAI
Only Evening Newspaper in Toledo Receiving Associated Press News
[[cutoff]]GES TOLEDO, OHIO, MONDAY, MAY 27, 1929

[[cutoff]]OT IN CHASE BY [[cutoff]]
[[cutoff]]s Set Endurance Mark
[[left column]]
LANE AT AGE OF 10
[[image of plane and two girls]]
George "Buck" Weaver, 10, fourth grade pupil at Whittier school, who piloted a Cessna monoplane from Lorain to Cedar Point, Sunday morning, is shown here with the rest of his "flying family." Next to "Buck" is his sister, Janet, who had her first air ride at the age of nine months, and at the right is Mrs. Hattie Meyers Junkin, mother of the two children, who is a widow of two airmen.

'BUCK' WEAVER'S SON EARNS HIS WINGS; ONLY 10 YEARS OLD
By R. E. Roberts
The flying son of a flying father earned his wings Sunday morning when George "Buck" Weaver, 10, fourth grade pupil at Whittier school, son of "Buck" Weaver, former army flying instructor, took [[?]] the controls of a Cessna monoplane high in the air and piloted the ship from Lorain to Cedar Point,[[cutoff]] greeting at Cleveland by a number of mail fliers, in addition to Major Berry, commandant of the Cleveland airport, who was a flying instructor with "Buck's" father in the army air corps. 
Parker Cramer, whose air life has been crowded with thrills, was frank to admit that "Buck" gave him an added thrill by handling the plane without any suggestions from him[[article continued on next page]]

[[right column]]
CUSTOMERS FLEE IN LIQUOR RAID; 9 WOMEN ARE HELD
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A crowd of men and women, estimated at 75 in number, fought to escape through doors and windows when police raided a supposed cabaret in Vance street Saturday night. 

Patrolmen Bokan and Graves reported that they followed a man who was carrying a quantity of liquor to the address and that scramble of customers ensued when they arrested Charles Jackson, 48, on account of possessing liquor.

Eleven persons, including nine women, were taken to the Safety building by the vice and liquor squads under direction of Lieutenant Harvey Klaiber and Patrolman Dave Clark during the week-end.

Walter Sweeny, 35, of Lucas street, was arrested on a charge of possessing liquor when police reported finding five gallons of whisky under flooring in the pantry of his home.

MAN, HANDCUFF SOUGHT HERE
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Tennessee Deputy Lets Prisoner Loose to Take a Bath.
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Unless John W. Clark has succeeded in ridding himself of a handcuff it should not be difficult for Evert Speart, deputy sheriff of Sylana, Tenn., and the police to find him. When Speart saw him last on Saturday night Clark told him he was going to take a bath.

Believing that "cleanliness is next to godliness," Speart gladly gave permission to his prisoner to bathe. At the same time he did not intend to take any chances on letting him escape. So he removed the cuff off one hand and left both dangling from the other. All this happened in Clark's Indiana avenue [[?]]

Clark, however, made good use of the opportunity of avoiding being taken back to Tennessee, where he is said to be wanted for a dry law violation. After locking the door of the bath room he did not linger. A window was too great a temptation to resist. With the handcuffs, he disappeared through it, as Speart learned when he missed hearing the splashing noise that usually goes with a bath.

Speart, wearing a big hat, big boots, big gun and everything, still is looking for his man Monday.
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Rongetti Quizzed in Second Death
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[[cutoff]]]

DULL WEATHER HITS BYRD CAMP
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Temperature Climbs to 5 Above Zero, Then Drops to 20 Below
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BY RUSSELL OWEN (By Wireless to the Toledo Blade)
(Copyright, 1929, by the Toledo Blade, the New York Times Co. and the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. All rights for publication reserved through the world.)
Little America, Antarctica, May 27 -It is still overcast and gloomy, as through the Antarctic were sulking at our comfort and trying to retaliate by limiting looks outdoors. 

There has been a full week of this dull weather, with comparatively mild temperatures. Saturday night it became as warm as five degrees above zero, a surprising rise as the wind was not unusually strong.

Sunday morning it was from the south and became a little colder and then shifted around to the east, where our storms [[come from?]]
[[crease]]
mercury dropped to 20 below zero again. It is as if the weather were brooding and trying to make up its mind what to do, but probably it won't do anything except get colder and colder, for the days of great cold are not far off.

There is a faint, discouraged moon shining through the haze and it is too bad, for now it should be at its brightest and it would be pleasant to have it light the way down the inlet trail, where most of the walking is done.

But no matter how moody and repellant the frozen world may be outside, it is warm and cheery in the houses and the days go very rapidly. In less than a month the winter day will be reached and we can look ahead to the return of the sun.
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