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Chronology of Aviation Happenings
According to NAA Archives
For the Month of January

1906 - The first exhibition of the Aero Club of America opened in New York in connection with the Automobile Show, January 13.

1908 - Henri Farman made a circular flight of about one mile at 54 MPH in a Voisin airplane at Issy, France, January 13.

1911 - Glenn H. Curtiss flew a seaplane from the water at San Diego, the first time this had been done in the U.S., January 26.

1915 - A new official American one-man duration record of 8 hours, 53 minutes was set by Lt. B. Q. Jones in a Martin Tractor biplane at San Diego, California, January 15.

1919 - The 2nd Army transcontinental flight was made by Maj. T. C. Macauley in DH-4 Liberty, January 21-31.

1925 - Orville Wright, Chairman of NAA's Robert J. Collier Selection Committee, announced that the 1924 Collier award is to be given to the U. S. Army Air Service for having accomplished the first aerial flight around the world, January 16.

1929 - A C-2 transport, the first airplane ferried by the Army Air Corps to a foreign station, flew 3130 miles from Wright Field, Dayton, Ohio to France Field, Canal Zone, January 9-16.

1935 - Amelia Earhart, in a Lockhead Vega, with a Pratt and Whitney Wasp engine, made the first solo flight from Hawaii to California in 18 hours, 16 minutes, January 11-12.

1940 - In the first American test of the practicability of moving a complete troop unit by air, a coast artillery battalion was transported 50 miles by 38 bombers of the 7th Bombardment Group, January 23.


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