Viewing page 1 of 18

Page One   History of Waco Library of Congress
No. 62[[?]]5967
QUOTE FROM: National Aeronautics Association .January 1976
Major General Leigh Wade (Sbok [[best guess]] - See Sept. 197[[?]] Reader's Digest), Mackay Trophy recipient for his 1924 historic Army flight around the World, Aviation Hall of Fame led the delegation to the Kitty Hawk Monument grounds in Dec. 1975.
----------------
A 13 cent stamp, to be placed on sale March 18, 1976 salutes commercial aviation in connection with the 50th anniversary year of the first CONTRACT airmail flights. The stamp features the airplane which flew the first contract airmail flight on Feb. 15, 1926. 
The Ford PULLMAN, all metsl monoplane, plus the LAIRD SWALLOW a biplane operated by the Varney Airlines ..APril 6, 1926. Ford Pullman rte Dearborn Michigan to Cleveland, Ohio and return as well bet' Detroit and Chicago. The SWALLOW flew between Pasco, Washington and Elke, Nevada via Boise, Idaho.
----------------------------------------------
About 1915, two Chgo youths, Emil "Matty "Laird and his friend George E. "Buck" Weaver were interested in flying. Chas.Dickenson millionaire Seed Merchant in Chgo sponsored in his middle yrs. the founding of the Aero Club of Illinois to foster this interest. All the pioneers set records in aviations early yrs. Major Shroeder Altitude; Geo."Buck" Weaver, a Civilian Advance Flying Instructor World War one in Signal Corps, soloed Wm. P. MacCracken, Chamber (SE6[[strikethrough]]T[[/strikethrough]]) of Commerce, Washington D.C.; The late General Eddie Glenn who got the airplanes to top the MIGS in Asia, after all but 8 of the first group were decimated; Eric Nelson on the 1924 flight later President of S.A.S. airlines; Lester Maitland, record flight and ass't Sec. Chamber Commerce; soloed at special [[strikethrough]]filed[[/strikethrough]] field Rich Field, Waco, Texas. Indian name of WACO was PROMOUNCED  H.U.A.C.O. When "Buck" soloed the cadets to 2nd [[strikethrough]]luixx[[/strikethrough]] Lt.s he yelled WAAKO! This yell was adopted by the AirForce, even used in War 11 which we never were going to let happen. After the War, or son, George C. Weaver, wartime flu baby was born 12/12/18.

Bill Stout (Later Ford Tri-Motor "Tin Goose"), Chgo. had built his first airplane, no one could fly it, waited for "Buck" to get his discharge. After the trial flight in Chgo. the plane was junked. This paid for our son's birth. 1919, after barnstorming, formed the Weaver Aircraft Co., in Lorain, Ohio. In sending a CABLE to Lt. De Saulle (12/12/18 Chgo. French Ace age 28yr.) who was sent to Buck at camp to record and maybe amplify the few stunts, acrobatics then known. As Buck with the other two in the Co., Elwood, J. JUNKIN and Clayton J. Brukner, gathered around the desk, I was holding my as yet unweaned son. The cable initials were W.A.C.O. Buck let out his WAAAAKO [[strikethrough]]yll[[/strikethrough]], yell, pushed the desk over with his laced boots, the baby yelled, and forever the name of the planes WACO. The boys separated in 1923, Buck to earn as Test Pilot, Laird in Wichita, Kan, and fly the over-nite oil millionaires...until quote Elwood J. Junkin, designer, formerly with Glenn Martin the Company could make some money. The first BIG WACOS were the WACO Eights, made in Medina, Ohio, 1922. [[strikethrough]]Buck [[?]] 1924[[/strikethrough]]. The Weaver Aircraft Co. Buck only pilot, taught C.J. Brukner in Medina, to fly. AIR A. I. Root Son Airline Harvy [[best guess]] Co. bought Waco Eight.
Buck died Aug. 1924, La Grange, Ill.
Business stopped at 11 as Air funeral took place.
HMJenkin
Jan 21, 1976
Please note that the language and terminology used in this collection reflects the context and culture of the time of its creation, and may include culturally sensitive information. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution, but is available in its original form to facilitate research. For questions or comments regarding sensitive content, access, and use related to this collection, please contact transcribe@si.edu.