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difficult to keep anything in focus. We're all sort of looking at the world through poloroid glasses, and not yet convinced that the skies are really cloudy. To some of us the thunder overhead is part of the illusion. That rumble is only Zeus toying with a pinball, trying to break 50,000. But somebody's going to get soaked.

Up-in-the-Air Lady
THE FIRST WOMAN to earn a soaring license was Mrs. Hattie Meyers Junkin of Garden City. If you don't know what soaring is, it's about the same as gliding, except that in a glider you come down if you're gliding. If you go up, that's soaring.
Mrs. Junkin is the attractive widow of one of America's very first pilots, George "Buck" Weaver, who founded the Waco aircraft factory. She's got aviation in her blood, and she's apparently passed it on to Buck Weaver's son, for he's now an airplane draftsman out in Akron, Ohio. He learned about planes at Roosevelt Field. Mrs. Junkin's 14-year-old daughter, Janet Junkin, is a student at Cherry Valley High School, but she's not quite so air=minded, yet. Getting that way though, since her trip to the last national glider meet at Elmira.
Mrs. Junkin's interest in planes seem to go back to her early childhood. She confesses that one of her very first model planes, while it stayed aloft for a distance of 250 feet, finally cracked up and into and through the cellar window of her home in Glen Ridge, New Jersey. She was only about ten years old then.
She stuck to her passion for motor-less aircraft and when the first German glider expert came to Cape Cod and Bayside in 1930 to demonstrate what Germany had accomplished in the way of glider development, they found Mrs. Junkin right there to find out all about it and learn what they had to teach. Germany developed gliding to a high degree because of the restrictions placed upon German aircraft production by the terms of the Versailles treaty. Buck Weaver had been a war pilot. Now his son is in a vital defense industry. The first man in to the world to be a licensed glider pilot was Wolfgang Klemperer, a German now working in this country. Another of the first German gliders was a man who was also one of Mrs. Junkin's instructors and who is now in Germany, one of their premier aces.
Hattie Meyers Junkin considers soaring exceedingly important as a preliminary step in the training of efficient pilots. She likes it for other reasons, too. She says she "gets perspective by going up and getting alone in the air, feeling the quietness and exhiliration of glider flying with its peacefulness and rythm." Maybe she's got something there.

Emerson's Grass
THIS SEEMS to be the month when the suburban male fondly invests in the future of his suburban lawn. Typical of his breed is a man we hear of named Emerson. Each year Emerson's Grass is

Petty Thieves Raid Freeport Shops
Freeport- Police here were searching for one or more small time Raffles, who sometime Monday night broke into three village shops and stole merchandise.
Kenneth Wilson, manager of a lumber yard at 27 Henry St., reported to police that some time after 5 P. M. Monday, petty thieves entered the yard building and took $10 worth of sash cord and sash chains. This is the second times in a week that the lumber yard had been robbed.
The proprietor of a clothing store at 14 West Merrick Rd., Israel Leon, notified the department that a glass showcase in the foyer leading to his shop had been smashed, and three corsets, three pairs of bloomers and a nurse's uniform, with a total value, including glass in the case, of $20, had been taken during the night.
Thieves entered the garage in the rear of a grocery store at 309 South Grove St. during the night and stole six cases of empty beer bottles, valued at $8 by the proprietor, Thomas Bateman. The thieves entered through an unlocked door.

$75,000 Suit Against L.I. Rail Road
Mineola - A $75,000 negligence suit against the Long Island Rail Road has been instituted by the families of Irwin Robert Scheer and John Flynn, truck drivers, who were killed in an accident at an unguarded grade crossing between Brentwood and Deer Park, 1939, according to Paul Leach, attorney for the plaintiffs.
Scheer and Flynn, Leach said, were killed instantly when their fish-loaded truck was struck by a Long Island train, behind schedule and hastening to make up time between the two towns. Wreckage from the truck was strewn along the track for yards by the 
had been the scene of several sever wrecks. The suit will probably come before the court next month, Leach said, were killed instantly when their fish-loaded truck was struck by a Long Island train, behind schedule and hastening to make up time between the two towns. Wreckage from the truck was strewn along the track for yards by the had been the scene of several severe wrecks. The suit will probably come before the court next month, Leach said.

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