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1000 Aviation. September 15, 1924
[[insigna, with Aeroplanes Vought on it]]

The new VOUGHT UO-I Spotting Seaplanes are the exclusive Aircraft Equipment of the Battleships and the new Scout Cruisers of the U.S. Navy's Atlantic and Pacific Fleets

Chance Vought Corporation
Borden and Review Avenues 
Long Island City, New York

Announcing
"The Story of Flying"
THE AIRCRAFT YEAR BOOK 1924
published by
THE AERONAUTICAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF AMERICA, Inc.
Last year was the most significant year in aeronautics. It marked the coming of age of aviation. It saw the definite beginning of the change flying from military to commercial. It saw the beginning to the United States of 33 out of 42 world records.
The Aircraft Year Book 1924 will have
150 pages of text covering aeronautics, military and commercial, in every country of the world.
40 pages of aircraft and engine drawings showing technical progress during 1923.
50 pages of photographs of important aeronautical events or illustrating the progress of aerial photography.
150 pages of references data, statistics, reports, etc. covering commercial and governmental aviation throughout the world.
Every person interested commercial or patriotically should have a copy.
Every member of the National Aeronautic Association should have a copy as his reference book. The volume will contain much information of vital interest to the N.A.A.
Every member of the Army, Navy and Postal Air Services needs a copy.
As the edition is limited, your order should be placed at once.
GARDNER PUBLISHING COMPANY INC.
225 Fourth Avenue, New York, N.Y.
Enclosed please find $5.25 (check, money order, drafts). Please send me post paid (U.S.) one copy 1924 Aircraft Year Book.
Name 
Address
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