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The 'Untin' Bowler in the Sub-Arctic
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IN A VISE OF ICE[[emdash]]The Bowler suffered its greatest damage as the baby bergs, drifting in from the sea, pushed it into a small cove at Port Burwell, Labrador. The crew of the Bowler is shown standing on the big ice chunk jammed under a wing.

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STRANDED ON THE ROCKS
[[emdash]] Fifty miles from the nearest habitation, the 'Untin' Bowler was forced down by fog on the desolate coast of Ungava Bay. Bob Gast, pilot of the Tribune plane, is here shown moving the anchor down on the rocks to prevent the plane from going ashore as it lowers quickly with a 40 foot tide.

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CHAIRMAN of the reception committee JOnah, one of the Port Burwell Eskimos who greeted the ship as it splashed into a fiord and taxied to shore near the settlement. Jonah spent the day sitting here on the rock and admiring the big "kyak" with wings.

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ESKIMOS HAVE NO POCKETS, but this young native jabs his hands inside his trousers to keep them warm. The picture was taken at Great Whale, a fur trading post on the eastern shore of Hudson Bay, where the 'Untin' Bowler stopped for fuel.

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THEY FOUGHT TO SAVE THE BOWLER[[emdash]]This group of natives worked day and night for four days pushing the crushing ice chunks away from the ship. The Bowler is shown in the background, imprisoned by the ice. At high tide the ship was level with the rocks where the Eskimos are standing.

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A HALL RUG some day. This polar bear was shot on the ice fields of Hudson Bay by the crew of the C. G. S. Acadia, the boat on which the 'Untin' Bowler flyers returned to civilization after their plane was lost.

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PORT BURWELL, UNGAVA[[emdash]]The picture shows the Burwell harbor after a fifty mile gale had cleared it of ice and with it swept the 'Untin' Bowler to sea. The Hudson Bay fur trading post and the dwellings of the mounted police are shown in the foreground. The open sea shown in the center background is where the ship sank.

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HOMEWARD BOUND[[emdash]]Bob Gast, pilot; Bob Wood, Tribune aviation editor, and Parker (Shorty) Cramer, pilot, the crew of the ill-fated Bowler, pictured on the bridge of the C. G. S. Acadia as the ship arrived a Fort Churchill, Manitoba, after a 1,000 mile cruise from Port Burwell.

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ART AMONG THE ESKIMOS[[emdash]]Post Factor Louis Maver at Great Whale taught his [[E]]skimo seal hunters how to draw. This is the handiwork of one of his natives, depicting a village of igloos. Note that kyaks, or seal skin boats, placed on top of the igloos, out of reach of the husky dogs, which would otherwise make a meal of them. And note, also, the Eskimo hieroglyphics.


Transcription Notes:
It would not let me insert an em dash so I wrote [[emdash]] where the em dash is needed [[E]] needs to be corrected to an E with an accent on it

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