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[29 Oct. 1946]

[[strikethrough]] 2817 First Rd. North,Arlington,Va.
29 October 1946.

Dear Miss Sherman:

I am answering your letter addressed to my husband partly because he is so pressed for time and partly because I enjoy writing about my only child more than he does.

As far as I can tell, without others to compare her with, she is an never has been any problem, except of course in having the handicap of growing up by herself. But I trust that her little angles may be properly polished off in her college life. She has an even disposition, and almost never gets angry. Ever since she was a baby she has loved a good laugh. I stayed home with her the first year, and as I was very busy all the time doing a lot of drawings, I used to put her in her high chair by my table while I worked. The greatest game we had was a laughing game. I would chuckle, and then she would until she would be in a gale of baby laughter. That trait has [[/strikethrough]]

[[handwritten]]
to put his foot down solidly. He has been walking about on his toes for weeks. He put one of your fish in a glass jar by himself and now has a swarm of little ones. Tonight he said he would get some algae up at the brook. I dont imagine we can rear them, though.

Sophy was pleased to hear from you. She doesn't like her present quarters. She lives out on Veasey St too, only on the other side of Wisconsin Ave from Helen. She is looking for an apt by herself. And she wants a car dreadfully too. She says she could live out at Falls Church if only she had a car. Her step mother is on a trip with friends to Florida and may be passing thru on the way back soon.

Dad bought a chicken a week ago that we were to have for Sunday but we were gone. I'm not going to roast it till I can eat it, too. Our food lasts so long, we can't get rid of it. Do you have enough or are you always hungry?

Now I'm going to listen to Bankage and probably have a nap before he finishes. He always puts me to sleep.

Love, Mother. 

Transcription Notes:
Bankage?

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