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NEW NEGRO OPINION


SUPPORT YOUR DRUGGIST
He Is Anxious To Serve You
THE MORE YOU USE HIM    
THE BETTER HE CAN SERVE YOU
Prescriptions Called for and Delivered


Druggists Directory
Bacchus
Ninth and P St., N.W.   No. 2440
Board's Drug Store
1912 1-2 14th St., N.W.   No. 2221
Butcher's Pharmacy
5th and Fla. Ave., N.W.   No. 3178
Carey's Pharmacy
1720 14th St., N.W.   No. 8954
Coger's Pharmacy
4th and Elm St., N.W.   No. 7356
Ethical Prescription Pharmacy 
518 Fla. Ave., N.W.   No. 6881
Garfield Park Drug Store
241 Va. Ave., S.W.    Lin. 8007
Hailstork's Pharmacy
Cor. 2 and H Sts., S.W.   Met. 6177
Hunton's Pharmacy
900 U St., N.W.   No. 1067
Jackson's Pharmacy
301 H St., N.W.   Met. 9348
Johnson's Pharmacy
600 3rd St., S.W.   Met. 6449
Jones' Drug Store
4800 Deane Ave., N.E.   Lin. 8901
Pinketts' Drug Store
N.J. Ave. at N St., N.W.   No. 2345
Simmons' Pharmacy
Cor. 21st and L, N.W.   West. 1453
The Thomas Pharmacy
1200 U St., N.W.   Dec. 0456
Walker's Pharmacy
2501 Nichols Ave, S.E.   Lin. 4015
Williams' Drug Store
1st and Va. Ave., S.W.   Met. 9214

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The Druggists' Problem

The New Negro Alliance is convinced, after two group conferences with representatives of the local colored druggists and interviews with many of the remaining colored druggists in the District, that one of the chief problems which confront the Negro druggist is that of acquiring the prescription business that now goes to the white drug store. 
The Alliance is interested in improving the business of Negro druggists. To that end, careful investigation has been made of current prices in white drug stores, both independents and chains. It has been found that the price ranges of the white and colored drug stores are approximately the same in the prescription business. On the other hand it has been discovered that much of the prescription business that by all rights belong to the Negro druggist has been diverted to the white drug store because Negro physicians use prescription blanks of white drug stores, and do not encourage their patients to have prescriptions filled by competent colored druggists.
Here again, we apply the slogan of the Alliance, "Buy Where You Can Work." No Negro can justify trading with a business outside of his own group unless he is unable to obtain satisfactory service from any member of his own group. In the case of the druggist and his prescription business there seems to be no logical justification for the use of white stores. 
The Negro drug store, like all other independent business, is at the present suffering from the competition of chain stores. It is virtually impossible for such a store to carry the widespread line of products now found in the combination lunch counter, hardware store, and department store that operates under the guise of a chain drug store. The very specialized nature of the profession places the independent owner at a disadvantage except in the prescription business. 
The issues are clear cut. If Negro professional men are to succeed and prosper, they must create what is in essence an economic cycle whereby the funds which they earn return to the basic group from which the money originally came. Unfortunately, the Negro at this 

A HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT LOOKS AT THE ALLIANCE
By GEORGE T. GREEN, JR.
9B3 Shaw Junior High School
We are living in an age not of the individual, but of organized forces based upon strong moral and economic principles. Some of these organizations have back of them persons who launch a movement without any idea of serving the public with sincerity. There is no place in this age for these types of persons. Time would be better used in turning our attention to such organizations which are of benefit to the good of the public.
There are many associated groups working for the public good, sponsored by far-seeing men. which deserve attention during these times. These men are, no doubt, imbued with the desire of progress. To my way of thinking,  the organization which impresses me most with its idea of helping to solve some of the difficult problems of a high school student is the New Negro Alliance.
We are taught that the student finishing high school finds himself generally incompetent to go out and meet the demands o this age without pursuing a higher course of training. Even though a high school graduate may have the knowledge and ability to enter college or other institutions for instruction in higher branches of business, art, and the sciences, he finds careers often blighted because of the financial weakness of his family and the race in general. The graduate unable to go to college is faced with added difficulties. He faces life sooner. His experiences, as they are, his ability and training must be applied sooner if the high school graduate would make an honest living. During this depression we find college graduates doing work which some of the less talented high school graduates should be doing. Conditions as they are today have leveled what was once the difference between opportunities for the high school and college graduate. 
Through the New Negro Alliance, both high school and college graduates can hope for some opportunity to use their experience, talents, and training. With this work developing into an organized public force, through the Alliance, which has made jobs for many graduates, more jobs can be opened up to the graduates and other persons have ability.

time has not sufficient business institutions to create a complete economic cycle. Consequently, we find that the average professional man is confronted with the tremendous problem of earning a livelihood from a group of people who are not prosperous. It would be absurd to infer that the cause of all of our troubles lies in the failure of the Negro to use the means which he has for employing other Negroes. However, serious consideration must be given to the tremendous amount of lost momentum that comes from all groups laboring separately instead of in a co-ordinated manner.
This condition is particularly true of the physician. Every cent which he earns comes from the pockets of Negro consumers. By every law of reciprocity he should feel it his profitable duty to patronize the group from which he earns his living. Otherwise there is no justification for using a colored physician in preference to a white physician.
The Alliance believes that the more mention of this problem of the druggists will bring a response from both the phyisicain and the public which will rectify this condition.

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COLLEGE GRADUATES OPEN JOB
CAMPAIGN FOR HARLEM NEGROES
At meeting on Thursday night at the residence of Dr. Aubre Del Maynard, the Sentinels, a group of young college graduates from both colored and white universities throughout the country, banded together with the objective of using their knowledge and leisure time towards the creation of jobs for Negroes in those stores in Harlem that get the major portion of their patronage from Negroes.
The members are unanimous in their opinion that too many attempts at racial progress have resulted in resolutions and programs that end as they start. The Sentinels are determined to prosecute their plans effectively and the new Negro Alliance anxiously watches the progress which this able sister group should make in New York City.
Officers of the Sentinel, now in the process of incorporation, are Dr. Maynard, president; Kenneth Bright, treasurer; Vester G. Fowlkes, secretray; and Attorney William Pickens, Jr., secretary of the executive committee.
The members are as follows: Dr. Reuben T. Young, Aaron Douglass, Dr. Norman, Pritchard, Eddie Morrow, Harriet I. Pickens, Ben Talbert, Ada Bates, Dr. A. G. Featherston, Noble Bridgewater, Ruby Pickens, Roi Ottley, Joshua Lee, Dr. E. G. Holder, Edgar T. Rouzeau, Dr. Richard Care, H.A. Washington, Chas. (Spinky) Alston, Howard Bearden, Jr.; Dr. T. T. Bowman, Dr. Ferdinand Forbes, Arthur C. Logan, Cecil Markues, Dr. John Theobald, J. Cyril Fullerton, David Watkins, and Arthur Logan.

REVEREND ELMES GIVES ENCOURAGEMENT
On Saturday, January 13, the Rev. A. F. Elmes, pastor of the Peoples Congregational Church, addressed the regular weekly meeting of the New Negro Alliance. The Reb. Elmes first congratulated the organization on its cool, intelligent approach to the problems which confront it. He emphasized the point that the future of the race depends largely on a new spirit of a new Negro.
The speaker quoted one of the old philosophers who once stated: "What a man fears determines how old that man is." We must expect obstacles to be placed in our path during our struggle for economic salvation, he pointed out. The proof of our leadership and of our new spirit will depend upon the courage and cool intelligence which we manifest in meeting these problems.
Obstacles, said the Rev. Elmes, only serve to arouse public interest in our cause, giving us a momentum which, when started, can't be stopped.

OUR NEXT SPEAKER
THE REV. E. C. SMITH
Pastor, Metropolitan Baptist Church
Jan. 26: DEAN WILLIAM WEST
Howard University
Meetings every Saturday, 7:30 p.m., at the Y.M.C.A.

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Transcription Notes:
Top of third column starts with a different than bottom of second. "The Druggists' Problem" continues under the line (bottom half of third column).

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