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APPEALS FILED IN INJUNCTION
(Continued from page 1)
reach every citizen within "a period of less than 24 hours should any emergency arise," said Albert DeMond, acting administrator.
"We have been and are now beset with difficulties which we largely expected when we formed this organization. But to work effectively for every citizen, regardless of his or her status, we propose to have a solid public back of us," continued Mr. DeMond. "Where money cannot be forthcoming, we expect workers to tie up with our district captains as block workers or deputy administrators. This is no class organization. Work and results are what we want. As an organization based on utmost sincerity purpose, we propose to get both in spite of present difficulties. Here, the Negro is facing an 'endurance test.' We can meet this test with a solid front."

ACT OF CONGRESS AN AID
Before Judge F. Dickinson Letts, of the District Supreme Court, granted the preliminary injunction to Harry Kaufman Department Stores, Inc., against the New Negro Alliance, Inc., on January 5th, all arguments by the attorneys for the Alliance centered around the Norris LaGuardia Anti-injunction Act, passed by Congress, March 23, 1932.
Counsel for the Kaufman firm appeared in court with what has been described as "antique cases" decided in several courts before Congress passed the Act regulating the filing of restraining orders in labor disputes and the relationships of the public to business and strictly industrial institutions.
Argued the attorneys for the New Negro Alliance, "In no wise is this case under consideration a departure from the provisions under the Norris-LaGaurdia Anti-injunction Act. Granting that the court is not willing to regard a patron of a business enterprise as a potential employee, we submit, however, that under the Anti-injunction Act, employer-employee relationships are not necessary to bring this present case under the definition of a labor dispute."
Early this week, Albert DeMond of the Alliance said of the case, "This is not a fight of local concern. It now has national significance. But our success in the courts is inevitably linked up with full and active support of every citizen of Washington to remove this barrier from the path which leads to economic justice for the working peoples of America. Before the 26th of this month our organization must have all of the 140,000 colored people of this city aware of our activities and working in our ranks to meet every crisis which will test our racial stamina. Those who fail to swing into our pioneering work will be regarded as social outcasts - and thereby unworthy of the economic benefits which come through the untiring efforts of the New Negro Alliance."

North 0358 Large and Small Contracts
WALTER E. PERKINS
PAINTING AND DECORATING
PLASTERING, CEMENTING,
REPAIRING
1722 15th Street, N.W.

CONGRESS HEARS OF NEGRO UNDER NRA
(Continued from page 1)
gressional Record, "For example, where an employer had a Negro elevator operator at $10 a week, finding himself forced by law to pay a minimum of $15 weekly, he fires the colored man and hires a white man to take his place. I realize that this condition could not have been foreseen during the enactment of the law, and yet the fact remains that the National Industrial Recovery Act up to the present time has been of no advantage to the Negro. That is all the more reason why some other stops should be taken to help the Negro."

EDUCATION NOT PUT TO USE
"At the present time, the number of vocational and occupational opportunities for the thoroughly qualified Negro is so limnited that we find the Negro college graduates are forced to accept employment in the msot menial capacities as porters, cleaners, and elevator operators, and yet tens of thousands of our Negro youth are today attending colleges with high hopes of the future but with little chance of being able to utilize their education in their chosen field of endeavor.
Says Senator Copeland's contribution of James J. Hoey's radio speech in the Congressional Record, further, "While I am in favor of higher education for the properly qualified youth of every race in America, I feel the most important problem for those individuals, associations, and foundations interested in the future of the Negro is this question of opportunity. These associations should, for the time being at least, suspend their interest in higher education and devote their efforts principally to the trask of creating wider opportunities of endeavor and employment for the Negro, and impress upon the employers of America the necessity of giving the colored race a just and proportionate share in the opportunities of employment."

JOB OPPORTUNITIES SOUGHT
"Up to now no adequate appeal has been made urging the employers of America to employ a just and fair proportion of Negroes, both in clerical positions and in the ranks of skilled and unskilled labor," continues the Hoey radio address.
"Although this may be called good economics and sound sense, it is essentially a question of opportunity and justice. As has been well said by a leading sociologist: 'Nothing is so dangerous fora . country as when a considerable number of men come up against a wall of despair in their future progress. Next to that is the danger when any considerable number of men get the idea that there is no opportunity. On the other hand, nothing makes a man work and strive like the open door of opportunity. The chance of improving one's conditions is a tonic to anyone to work and serve.' The importance of the idea of opportunity in American citizenship must be obvious.
"I suggest that the various philanthropic groups, institutions, and educational foundations such as the Carnegie Foundation, Rockefeller Foundation, and the Phelps-Stokes Fund investigate this great problem. They should make a survey to determine all the facts and publish their findings and recommendations. Thereafter they should lead an extensive campaign of education among employers and industrial leaders of America to the end that the neglected Negro majority, may, in greater numbers, secure the essential opportunity of employment and livelihood and the chance of promotions and advancement, each in his own field of occupation. 
"In conclusion let me say that such a program carried to a successful completion would prove the greatest single achievement in racial justice for the Negroes in America since the Emancipation Proclamation of the great liberator, Abraham Lincoln."

LEAGUE SEEKS HELPFUL CRITICISMS
The Better Business League which includes all of the new employees of the A & P Stores is leaving no stone unturned in its efforts to make good. Every opportunity for increased efficiency in merchandising is eagerly sought after and thoroughly exploited.
Mr. Reginald Washington, president of the league, is very desirous of receiving any complaints, criticisms, or suggestions in regard to improving the service now rendered in retail stores. High standards of courtesy, politeness, accuracy, speed, neatness, cleanliness, and general efficiency are to be maintained and continually improved. Any suggestions from consumers will be promptly acted upon.
The league is also planning to make a study of problems confronting merchants and business men of our group. In this connection it would be very glad to have the co-operation and assistance of local business men who are interested in improvement of Negro business and opportunities for increased efficiency in merchandising.

LINCOLN
1215 U STREET, N.W.
Phone North 3000
ONE WEEK ONLY
Beginning, Friday, January 19
NEVER so many STARS in ANY picture
Dinner at 8
MARIE DRESSLER
JOHN BARRYMORE
WALLACE BERRY
JEAN HARLOW
Lionel BARRYMORE
LEE TRACY
EDMUND LOWE
BILLIE BURKE
Madge Evans Karen Morley
Jean Hershold Philips Holmes
COMING SOON!
Personal Appeaarnce of 
ETTA MOTEN

REPUBLIC THEATRE
1343 YOU STREET, N.W.
4 - Days Only -4
Beginning Friday,
January 19
Otto Kruger
in 
"WOMEN IN HIS LIFE"
with
Ben Lyon --- Una Merkle

TUES.-WED.-THURS.
January 23-24-25
Richard Arlen
in
"HELL and HIGHWATER"
WITH
JUDITH ALLEN

Broadway
SUN.-MON. Jan 21-22
Charles (Buddy) Rogers
in
"TAKE A CHANCE"
with Cliff Edwards, Lillian Roth
Lillian Bond, June Knight

TUESDAY JAN. 23
LIONEL ATWILL
"Fighting with Kit Carson"
in "SOLITAIRE MAN"
With Herbert Marshall, Elizabeth "Fighting with Kid Carson"
Chapter No. 6

WED.-THURS. Jan. 24-25
Marie Lionel
Dressler and Barrymore
in
"Christopher Bean"

FRI.-SAT. Jan 26-27
Buck Jones
in
"FIGHTING CODE"
Also 
"GORDON of GHOST CITY"
Chapter No. 8

SUN.-MON. Jan. 21-22
ANN HARDING in
"The Right to Romance"
with
Nils Asther, Sari Maritza,
Roland Young
Extra Added Attraction
Adelaide Hall
in
"On the Air and Off"
Bill (Bojangles) Robinson
Pops and Louie
of the Whitman Sisters in
"THE BIG BENEFIT"

TUES.-WED.-THURS.
JAN. 23-24-25
MAE WEST
in
"I'm No Angel"
with Cary Grant

FRI. Jan. 26
"Turn Back the Clock"
with Lee Tracy

SAT. Jan. 27
Tim McCoy in
"STRAIGHTAWAY"
Also Chapter No. 7
"GORDON of GHOST CITY"
Starring BUCK JONES

SUN.-MON. Jan 21-22
BING CROSBY
"Too Much Harmony"
With Jack Oakie, Skeets Gallagher

TUESDAY Jan. 23
Double Feature Bill
"Behind Jury Doors"
and
"Ship of Wanted Men"

WEDNESDAY Jan. 24
Carole Lombard
"Brief Moment"
Chap. No. 7, 'Three Muskateers'

THURSDAY Jan. 25
"LADIES MUST LOVE"
with 
June Knight, Neil Hamilton
and Tom Keene in
"SCARLET RIVER"

FRI. Jan. 26
Joan Crawford and Clark Gable
'DANCING LADY"

SATURDAY Jan. 27
John Wayne in
"SAGEBRUSH TRAIL"
Also Chapter No. 7
"GORDON of GHOST CITY"
Starring Buck Jones

BOOKER - T 
ONE WEEK
BEGINNING
FRIDAY,
JANUARY 19th
The Picture of Pictures
Phone North 3000
"TThe House of Hits"
1433 YOU STREET, N.W.
Katharine Hepburn in
"LITTLE WOMEN"
with JOAN BENNETT -- FRANCES DEE
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