Viewing page 6 of 23

8  THE NEW YORK MAGAZINE PROGRAM
_______________
the french
have a word for it

[[image: line drawing of elegant man and woman in evening dress, she reclining, he standing smoking, beside the chairs are a cocktail table with drinks]]

"soignée"
(swä nyãy)

To wear the smartest clothes, know the smartest people, go the smartest places, do the smartest things -- that, in a word, is SOIGNEE.

Above all things the truly soignee person is a lover of quality. In every field she knows a half dozen names that connote ultra chic with utmost quality. In lovely hosiery that name is MERIT! Laboratory Certified QUALITY.

MERIT
ASSOCIATED HOSIERY MILLS, INC.
200 MADISON AVENUE, NEW YORK
______________
[[image: small icon of dramatic face]]

WHAT the WOMAN WILL WEAR
Continued

The news has been noised abroad through all the land these several months that it is no longer enough to wear shining tresses above shining gowns by night. It has now become almost a rule [[image: line drawing of woman's head in profile with tiara, indication of gleaming sparkle; drawing of a sparkling headcomb ]]
[[caption]] (5) Flashing Jewels [[/caption]]that the gleam of well-coiffed heads be augmented by flashes of fire from jewelled headdresses and hair ornaments; or, failing that, by touches of bright color in simple bands or clips. Anything, in short, rather than a head unadorned. You can even resurrect your grandmother's topknot tortoise-shell comb with the row of little balls sitting all along its edge, and wear it to advantage with a hostess gown at your own tea-parties.

Daughters of combless ancestresses should look carefully at sketch 6 on this page, in which a lady gowned for dinner at home has combed her longish hair into a French twist at the back (surely you remember the old prewar French twist?), pinning the loose vertical roll down with a modern [[image: line drawing of back view of a seated woman in elegant dress with neatly coiffured hair]]
[[caption]] (6) For Dining at Home [[/caption]] version of the topknot comb grandmother should have had. The new one is flatter, with the knobs lying desirably closer to the head. It comes in an undetectable imitation of real shell, and you can buy it at Saks-5th Avenue.

The same shop can supply you also with the jeweled shell tiara shown in sketch 5. This is one of the handsomest developments of the Russian diadem type to reach the market to date. We recommend it for its fit and flattery. The rhinestone cuff-bracelet shown in the same sketch is a striking wrist ornament to wear with such a tiara. Its best effect is achieved in pairs--one for each arm. They won't weigh you down, since the stones are set in featherweight prystal. Altman's have these.             -M.

THE MUSIC BOX  9

[[image: illustration of woman's face, with a diagram superimposed: a dotted line showing the vertical middle third of the face]]

This troublesome Shine Area yields to Dull finish face powder!

RUN your fingers down your forehead, nose and chin. It's here that most women have "make-up trouble"... a bothersome shine because powder won't stay on--or a heavy layer that shrieks "powdered!"

Houbigant Dull Finish Face Powder can end your annoying problem. It makes that panel--and all your face--a petal-smooth area of loveliness in which the powder plays no visible part. The unique Houbigant texture-blend gives a true Dull Finish that ends shine for hours. Oily skin, dry skin--large pores, fine pores--all are equally veiled in flattery.

[[image: a tin of the face powder featuring an illustration of a beribboned basket of flowers]] Choose Houbigant Dull Finish Face Powder in the famous odeurs Quelques Fleurs or Le Parfum Ideal, at any department or drug store. Price $1, (or a demi-size at 55c), Its six shades comprise the full range of skin tones.

HOUBIGANT 
DULL finish
FACE POWDER

[[image: NRA MEMBER U.S. WE DO OUR PART]]
© H.S.C., 1933
*REG. U. S. PAT. OFF.

Transcription Notes:
I'm unsure about the ã in swä nyãy. Please check this- cutiex I find that some fonts render this line a wavy line as we are used to in a tilde and others make it straight. I don't know if it matters linguistically - VHB.

Please note that the language and terminology used in this collection reflects the context and culture of the time of its creation, and may include culturally sensitive information. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution, but is available in its original form to facilitate research. For questions or comments regarding sensitive content, access, and use related to this collection, please contact transcribe@si.edu.