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14   THE NEW YORK MAGAZINE PROGRAM

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GLOSSARY OF THEATRICAL TERMS

ANGEL...
A show's fairy godfather; optimist.
BABY SPOT...
Small spotlight.
DOG SEAT...
Theatre seat number K9
DOLL...
Show girl; pretty but empty-headed woman (Webster).
FADER...
Orchestra leader.
MOUTH-HAPPINESS...
See SPUD.
MUGGING...
Kidding the part.
PULLMAN...
Elevator to dressing-room.
SPUD...
The smoothest round of smoking enjoyment the stage world has discovered; the menthol-cooled cigarette you have to smoke to find out what "mouth-happiness" means. (20 for 15c)
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WHAT the MAN will WEAR [[image]]
EVENING: The man-oi-fashion perfects what the crowd neglects. It is by the delicate shadings and nuances in evening dress that one gains the savor of self-expression and the air soigné. This is notable true of collar, shirt and tie which may still be individualized whereas the rest of the kit is standardized to a common mould.
This column has pointed out repeatedly the spreading vogue of the pleated-front shirt to pair off with the dinner jacket. Instead of the conventional narrow pleats, one may go in for those broad pleats pictured in the accompanying sketch. The effect is newer and smarter, and the wide-pleated bosom is prone to lie flatter. Cuffs are the French double-fold type but laundered flexibly so that they do not stick in one's jacket-sleeve, a waspish annoyance.
[[image]] Broad Pleats
The evening collar should always be of fairish height, preferably sloping lower from back to front. The form shown is a fashionable favorite, because the tabs are set in the correct position, neither too stodgily straight nor overly angled. The black silk tie is the elongated affair with the snug knot and those pointed ends that look jaunty and youthful.

AFTERNOON: Some fashions sizzle up like a headache powder and subside as quickly. Others become weft and woof of the fine art of dress, because they are rooted in sense and fitness. A case in point is the riding stock. This is much less worn in the States than in Britain, but no seesaw or somersault of the mode has ever succeeded in dislodging
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THE MUSIC BOX   15

THE EMBASSY CLUB
151 EAST 57th STREET
VELOZ and YOLANDA World Premier Dancers
THE YACHT CLUB BOYS Adler-Kelly-Kern-Mann Presenting Their Original Songs
GERTRUDE NIESEN Columbia's Featured Radio Songstress
BOB GRANT Society Dance Orchestra
VAL OLMAN and his Continental Orchestra
No Cover Charge at Any Time For Dinner Guests
DINNER SHOW 7:45  SUPPER SHOW 12:30 a.m.
SPECIAL DINNER SERVED NIGHTLY $3.00
SPECIAL LUNCHEON $1.00 MUSIC BY VAL OLMAN
SUNDAY TEA DANSANT 3:30 to 6 p.m. $1.50 PER PERSON
For reservations: Vol. 5-4900

Broadway's Brightest Comedy of Young Love !
The Curtain Rises
With JEAN ARTHUR KENNETH HARLAN DONALD FOSTER
2nd MONTH
"Here Is A Comedy Of All Those Scenes You Like The Best" BURNS MANTLE News
48th STREET THEATRE
Evenings 8:45 - 50¢ to $2.50 Mats. WED. & Sat. 2:45 - 50¢ to $2.50
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