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can fail to understand the clear, class character of the present system.

NEGRO WORKERS MUST FIGHT AGAINST WAR. 
Therefore, the Negro toilers are looking for a way out of the devastating crisis which capitalist misrule has brought upon all peoples today. They are beginning to discover their friends, -- the white working class -- and their enemies -- the white ruling class, and the Negro misleaders. 
Therefore, they are ready for the coming imperialist slaughter; they give warning to the war mongers, and murderous plunderers: THEY WILL FIGHT TOGETHER WITH THE WHITE WORKING CLASS AGAINST ANY ATTEMPT OF THE CAPITALISTS TO PLUNGE THE WORLD INTO ANOTHER IMPERIALIST WAR, AND WILL STRIKE A BLOW FOR COMPLETE WORKING CLASS EMANCIPATION. 

Proposed Bill for Negro Rights in the U.S.A.
EDITOR'S NOTE: 
This Bill for Negro Rights and the Suppression of Lynching has been drawn up by the League of Struggle for Negro Rights. The National Council of the L. S. N. R. declare their intention to wage a mass struggle for the passage and enforcement of this Bill by the American Congress.  - They emphasize that only through mass action of black and white workers against Negro oppression will the passage of this Bill be possible. We reprint the Bill in full: 
BILL FOR NEGRO RIGHTS AND THE SUPPRESSION OF LYNCHING.
TO Abolish the Practice of Lynching of Negroes, and to Secure Full Equality and Civil Rights, Throughout the United States of America
SECTION 1: BE IT ENACTED BY THE SENATE AND HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA IN CONGRESS ASSEMBLED, that because the rights of the Negro people, although guaranteed by the Constitution of the United States of America, 13, 14, 15 Amendments, have been and are being systematically violated, as shown by: the denial of the rights of citizenship and equality, the denial in many sections of the country o ftheir [[of their]] right to vote, to serve on juries and to enjoy equal rights in courts of law, the system of peonage and slavery and chain gang widely practiced in the South, the wholesale frame-ups against innocent Negroes and other such oppressive practices, the fact that during the past fifty years more than 5,000 lynchings have taken place in the United States and with very little effort on the part of the Police or Judicial Authorities to apprehend or to punish the guilty parties; therefore it becomes necessary to adopt special measures to suppres [[suppress]] the practice of lynching and to secure to the Negro people the full and free exercice [[exercise]] of complete equal rights with every other section of the population.
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SECTION 2: — Every person participating in a lynching is declared to be guilty of murder in the first degree, and upon conviction shall be punished by death. Lynching is defined as a violent assault, resulting in death or aggravated injury, directed against the victim because of supposed inferiority of the Negroes, and/or, because he or she is accused of a crime associated with such supposed inferiority, and/or, when such violent attacks are wholly or partly directed towards intimidating the Negro population to prevent them from claiming their rights, and/or, when such violence is directed towards preventing the free association of whites and Negroes and their joint activity in all phases of life. Such violent attack shall be considered a lynching whenever motivated by any or all of the above, whether the attacker or attackers are private individuals or officers of the law, or both, and whether or not such attack was directed against any particular individual. Participation in any attempted lynching shall be a felony, punishable by imprisonment for not less than one year.

SECTION 3: — Any official or official body of any subdivision of the United States government or the government of any state, county, or municipality, who shall adopt or enforce any measure aimed at or resulting in, the denial of full equality of Negroes, is guilty of a malfeasance in office, and is subject to immediate removal and is guilty of a felony. In such category of prohibited measures, are all so-called Jim-Crow laws and regulations which provide for segregation of, or discrimination against Negroes, which deprive them of the right to vote through the enacting of special qualifications which in practice result in depriving the Negroes of the franchise, which exclude them from Jury lists or panels, and in practice result in the dismissal of persons from Juries on account of being Negroes, which exclude Negroes from any employment or office, or which in any way directly or indirectly deprive the Negroes of their full and complete rights of participation in any phase of public life.

SECTION 4: — Any person who shall in his private capacity discriminate against Negroes, in employment or in the renting or other occupancy of any dwelling or business quarters, or who shall charge higher prices or rents to Negroes than to the general public, or who shall refuse to render to Negroes professional services which he or she normally offers to the public, shall be declared guilty of a misdemeanor, punishable by not less than six months in prison, and upon a third repetition of the offense is guilty of a felony, punishable by not less than two years in prison, in both cases in addition to punitive damages payable to the person discriminated against.

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