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[[stamped]] FROM THE FLYING PIONEERS BIOGRAPHIES OF HAROLD E. MOREHOUSE [[/stamped]]

6 ANDRE HOUPERT
27 Pioneer Bleriot Monoplane Pilot- Instructor 

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Andre Houpert was born near Paris, France May 29, 1886. Information is lacking regarding his education early life, but he [[strikethrough]] obviously [[/strikethrough]] was mechanically inclined and developed an early interest in aviation when it started in France. As a result he learned to fly at the Bleriot School at Pau, France, in late 1910 and was granted French Flying License No. 441, dated May 3, 1911. 

It is not known when he came to the United States, but when the Moisant School of Aviation started at Hempstead, Long Island, [[strikethrough]] New York [[/strikethrough]] on May 13, 1911, Houpert was there as instructor. It is believed that he was probably induced to come to this country by John B. Moisant [[strikethrough]] and that [[/strikethrough]] They had [[strikethrough]] undoubtedly [[/strikethrough]] become acquainted at the Bleriot School. Houpert had built a small plane in France some time before, which he brought over and was stored in a shed by the Moisants. Houpert had an holder brother, Henri, who already lived in New York and operated a small garage in the city. This [[strikethrough]]which [[/strikethrough]] may [[strikethrough]] have [[/strikethrough]] also have had some influence in andre's [[strikethrough]] his [[/strikethrough]] coming to the United States.

The Moisant School started at Garden City, Long Island, with Offices in  New York, known as the Hempstead Plains Aviation Company. The school began with one Bleriot monoplane, powered by a 3-cylinder, 30 Anzani engine, [[strikethrough]] no. [[/strikethrough]]

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Transcription Notes:
Same as Page 6 but with some different edits

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