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at the Chicago Meet held at Grant Park on the lake front August 12th to 20th. There he entered the various monoplane events and made a good showing. On the 15th he entered an over-water event and had been in the air for some time when suddenly his plane dove into the lake about one mile off shore and disappeared from view. Hugh Robinson was flying nearby in a Curtiss Hydro and alighted [[?]] at once on the spot where Johnstone went down. Robinson hoped to take him aboard as soon as he came up. Some wreckage was floating but Johnstone failed to come to the surface. Robinson stood by in his hydro until the machine was raised, only to find Johnstone trapped in the wreckage. Efforts to revive him were in vain. The cause of his accident was never explained. Other aviators had fallen in the lake before without fatalities.

Johnstone was 26 years of age and recently married. He was survived by his wife and parents. Cremation followed his funeral service. At the insistence of his wife and parents he had planned to give up flying after the meet and go into the supply business.

Flying Pioneer St. Croix Johnstone was one of the unfortunate early pilots who lost his life after but a few months of active flying, nevertheless his name must not be lost in the annals of early American aviation history. He was enthusiastically in earnest and trying to assist in the early acceptance of the new science of flight.
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