Viewing page 6 of 14

HARRY W. POWERS
Pioneer Chicago Aviator

[[stamp]] FROM THE FLYING PIONEERS BIOGRAPHIES OF HAROLD E. MOREHOUSE [[/stamp]]

Information is lacking concerning the date and place of birth of Harry W. Powers, and his early life and education.
In the early 1900's while living in Chicago he became interested in aviation with the first activities in flying in that area.
During the winter of 1910-1911 he became associated with San Dixon, a Chicago Automobile dealer who had formed the International Aeroplane Company to build planes, conduct a flying school and engage in exhibition flying at fairs and carnivals. Early Birds Anthony Stadlman and Allan Lockheed were also working for Dixon.
A Curtiss-type pusher biplane had been built by Stadlman, powered by a Roberts engine, and during the early spring months of 1911 this plan was kept in a tent hangar at the site soon to be called Cicero Flying Field. Otto Drodie and mechanic R. W. Schroeder [[strikethrough]] also [[/strikethrough]] occupied an adjoining tent hangar. Lockheed already had a little flying experience and soon Powers was flying this plan on short hops. 
Early that season Dixon sold the business to Dr. Edwin Spates who had more extensive plans for exhibition work. At that time he had two planes and amateur aviators Ludvig and Rosenbaum in this employ. As soon as the fair season started pilots Lockheed, Powers, Ludwig and Rosenbaum started on the road flying exhibition engagements, and Stadler was kept busy trying to keep the planes [[strikethrough]] re- [[/strikethrough]]
1
[[image]] Harry W. Powers [[/image]]
Please note that the language and terminology used in this collection reflects the context and culture of the time of its creation, and may include culturally sensitive information. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution, but is available in its original form to facilitate research. For questions or comments regarding sensitive content, access, and use related to this collection, please contact transcribe@si.edu.