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[[stamped]] FROM THE FLYING PIONEERS BIOGRAPHIES OF HAROLD E. MOREHOUSE [[/stamped]]

ANTHONY "TONY" STADLMAN
Pioneer Aviator - Aircraft Manufacturer - Development Engineer

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Anthony Stadlman was born at Kourim, Bohemia, Czechoslovakia, January 12, 1886, the son of a land holder and jobber in dehydrated foods. He received his education in Prague and during his youth was a lover of sports, becoming an expert gymnast.

Mechanically inclined he loved to spend all available time in his uncle's blacksmith shop where he learned many mechanical skills, later to be of great value to him. In 1906, at age 20, he would be in line for military conscription which he deeply resented as he would have to serve in the oppressors army so, in September, 1905, before he could be inducted, he came to the United States. He knew some English, and went to Chicago where he got a job as a helper in the engine room of a hotel.

Continuing to work there Stadlman became interested in aviation as more of the progressive developments of the early [[strikethrough]] aeroplane [[/strikethrough]] airplane experiments became known. Amateur plane building was just starting in the Chicago area and he made several unsuccessful attempts to get into this work. By the fall of 1910 he had saved enough money to pay his admission to the Chicago School of Aviation, believing this would give him a start [[strikethrough]] in the game [[/strikethrough]] but this turned out to be a hoax.

By midsummer of 1911 Stadlman became employed by Sam Dixon, a

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