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WILLIAM S. JOHNSON, CHAIRMAN
MAYME BROWN, SECRETARY-TREASURER

COMMITTEE ON JOBS FOR NEGROES IN PUBLIC UTILITIES
1920 13TH STREET, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C.
OFFICE HOURS:
MON., WED., FRI. 6 TO 6 P.M.

December 3, 1943
Mr. Tomlinson Todd, Chariman
Institute on Race Relations
Washington, D. C.

Dear Mr. Todd:
It is now nearly a year since the President's Committee on Fair Employment Practice issues its first directive to the Capital Transit Company, ordering the employment of Negroes as bus an dstreet-car operators. To date, as you know, we see no Negroes in such positions. 

Several factors are involved in this delay. The old F.E.P.C., under the War Manpower Commission, was robbed of much of its prestige by Commissioner McNutt's arbitrary cancellation of the railroad hearings; several members resigned; a new chairman and a new committee were appointed and had to go through a period of organization. These facts are well known to all who are interested in seeing the F. E. P. C. directive enforced. 

In addition, a vital element has been lacking in our campaign to procure "platform" jobs for Negroes--a united front among all the organizations concerned about this question. Such unity has marked the three-month old Philadelphia campaign, which bids fair to reach a successful conclusion before we here in Washington see any results from our year's work.

The Committee on Jobs for Negroes in Public Utilities invites your organization to send two representatives to a planning conference on Sunday, December 12, 1943, at 4:30 o'clock, at the 12th Street Y.M.C.A., to discuss principles and methods on which all groups can present a united front.

Very truly yours, 
W.S. Johnson
Chairman
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