Viewing page 13 of 520

SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION   1211

Immediately with the close of hostilities for information and other assistance increased, while presently there was a change from the wartime 48-hour week to a 40-hour week. These matters were considered carefully and estimates for the fiscal year 1947 include increases for personnel and other funds. These estimates were examined in great detail by the Bureau of the Budget and the increases requested were allowed with little change from the original figures. It was hoped that Congressional action would be favorable, as these requests for moderate increase were submitted with full understanding of the necessity for economy in this postwar period.

Personnel. The Smithsonian Institution under its private funds at the moment carries 46 positions that are not under Civil Service, these employees working side by side with those on the Federal rolls. In various cases there were inequities in pay between the two groups. On July 1, 1945, at the time of a major pay roll adjustment for the entire Federal service, there was a similar adjustment for the Smithsonian employees, that has been equivalent to establishing the Smithsonian positions in a classification similar to that of the Civil Service, with a revision of the salary rates where necessary to make them coincide with the new salary rates under the Civil Service. At the same time, provision was established for regular promotions at the rates stipulated for the Federal Service. The only exceptions to this have been for those paid on a contract basis, or those who are covered under other special stipulations. In effect this has been a reorganization in the interests of increased efficiency. 

A.W.
Please note that the language and terminology used in this collection reflects the context and culture of the time of its creation, and may include culturally sensitive information. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution, but is available in its original form to facilitate research. For questions or comments regarding sensitive content, access, and use related to this collection, please contact transcribe@si.edu.