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"RETURN SURPLUS LANDS TO INDIAN PEOPLE"
NATIONAL COMMITTEE

P.O. Box 409
Davis, California 95616

916-758-0470

NATIVE AMERICANS: TAKE NOTE!!

President Nixon stated on March 31, 1971 that he plans to transfer federal surplus lands valued at $6.8 billion dollars to state and county governments and to commercial and industrial firms.

Top priority categories for these surplus lands are airport sites, fish and wildlife reserves, parks, health, education, and welfare projects. INDIAN TRIBES and INDIAN ORGANIZATIONS should be placed in this TOP PRIORITY category as soon as possible before the choice lands are gone. 

Years ago the federal government took these lands from the Indians because they said they needed them for forts, military installations, roads, railroads, home-steading, and other purposes.

Today, the federal government is saying they no longer need these lands — that the are surplus. Who is more entitled to these properties than their original owners ... the American Indian?

Indians are America's most deprived and exploited minority

Indians have: 
the lowest level of education — 5th grade
the lowest life expectancy — 44 years
the lowest income — 50% under $1,500
the highest infant mortality rate
the highest suicide rate
the highest rate of alcoholism

President Nixon acknowledged these realities when he stated that the "first Americans—are the most deprived and isolated minority in the nation."

These surplus lands are needed for SCHOOLS, HEALTH CLINICS, HOSPITALS, HALF-WAY HOUSES FOR ALCOHOLICS AND PRISONERS, INDIAN CULTURE CENTERS, Museums, Pow-Wow Grounds, Indian Centers, Day Care Centers, Athletic Fields, Housing. 

WHAT CAN BE DONE?? ACTION!! ACTION NOW!!!

WRITE LEGISLATORS: Encourage them to have Indian Tribes and Indian Organizations placed in the top priority category for surplus lands. Ask them to sponsor a bill or resolution to this effect. 

President Richard Nixon
Washington, D.C.

Vice President Spiro Agnew
Washington, D.C.

Don't forget
Your local Legislators

Senator George McGovern, Chairman
Indian Affairs Sub-Committee
Senate Office Building
Washington, D.C.

Louis R. Bruce, Commissioner
Bureau of Indian Affairs
Department of the Interior
Washington, D.C.

Secretary Elliot Richardson
Department of Health, Education and Welfare
Washington, D.C.

National Council Indian Opportunity
Robert Robertson
726 Jackson Place
Washington, D.C.

THE PRECEDENT FOR SECURING SURPLUS SITES HAS BEEN SET: The Indians won their first major victory in 100 years when they received the deed to three million dollars worth of surplus federal property April 3, 1971 in order to establish Deganawidah-Quetzalcoatl University at Davis, California. 

FORM NON-PROFIT EDUCATION CORPORATIONS—
Get a group of Indian educators together. Form a corporation (only three are needed), look around for a suitable site for a school.

ORGANIZE OTHER INDIAN INTEREST CORPORATIONS— 
You have to incorporate and have by-laws before the federal government will recognize your organization. (For aid in incorporation, contact your area legal aid offices).

SUBMIT PROPOSALS TO STATE AND FEDERAL AGENCIES, FOUNDATIONS, ETC.:— 
Check regional offices of Health, Education and Welfare, Office of Economic Opportunity, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs for assistance in writing proposals. Ask these groups for proposal writing classes. 

JOIN "R.S.L.I.P."—
RSLIP, a national committee to "RETURN SURPLUS LANDS TO INDIAN PEOPLE", is now being formed. The purpose of the group is to research Surplus Sites and make the information available to interested Indian Tribes and organizations. Direct inquiries to the attention of Grace Thorpe, R.S.L.I.P., P.O. Box 409, Davis, California 95616.
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