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The Davis [[cutoff]]
If it's for the good of Da[[cutoff]]
302 G Stre[[cutoff]]
Over[[cutoff]]
Army[[cutoff]]

A long and complex series of moves at virtually every level in the political and bureaucratic process culminated at 3 p.m. today when Sol Elson, director of surplus property in the department of health, education, and welfare, handed to Dr. David Risling, chairman of the board of the Deganahwidah - Quetzalcoatl University, a deed to the 640 acres, and 10 beige buildings which were formerly the Army communications site on road 31, six miles west of Davis.

The mood was one of satisfaction with a sense of achievement as more than 400 people observed the ceremonies.

The act marked one of the more extraordinary victories the Indian and Chicano people have recorded in their historic hassles with the white man. They now have the land and buildings with which they hope to build a University to help their peoples and define their own cultures.

The "victory" the Indians and Chicanos have won has been billed by Grace Thorpe, DQU's public informations officer, as the first for people indigenous to the western hemisphere since the defeat of Custer.

It has also been termed by U.S. Senators Alan Cranston, John TUnney, and George McGovern, plus congressmen and state legislators, a milestone in minority group efforts at self-determination.

If the University is successful, Indians and Chicanos will have courses oriented towards their particular needs in a white society of which they are not fully a part, say DQU founders.

But there is still the question of building the University itself, which may be the toughest of all things to achieve.

Presently, the DQU has only $10,000 in the bank, says Mrs. Thorpe, and badly needs contributions from individuals to keep it growing on schedule till the anticipated grants come in, $200,000 each from the office of economic opportunity and the Ford foundation.

The DQU has an account at the Bank of California in Davis, Mrs. Thorpe says.

There are the employees to hire, the systems to get set up, the teachers and courses organised, the phones to be put in, the beds to acquire, the food, kitchens, and all the facilities of a large institution to be rounded up.

Witnessed the transfer of title from the HEW to the DQU today, among them national and regional officials from the bureau of Indian affairs, from the Government services administration, the HEW itself, from Governor Ronald Reagan's office and from the office of Vice-president Spiro Agnew.

Elson himself is the emissary of HEW secretary Elliot Richardson. Cranston, McGovern, and Tunney were invited to come but have sent telegrams at the last minute saying they were unable to.

Nevertheless, the crowd will be engaged in religious ceremonies and outright celebrations, Indian Pow-wows and Chicano fiestas, far into the night. Proceedings began today at 9 a.m. with a meeting of the board of trustees, which led to a press conference at 1 p.m. plus meetings with the visiting officials by the DQU board, and then at 2 the official ceremonies.

At 2:30 Adam Nordwall, president of the Bay area council of Indians presented the DQU with the peace pipe which will be smoked at the beginning of this and all the special occasions at DQU from now on.

Jack Forbes, one of the founders of the DQU and a member of its board, will deliver a history of how the DQU came about, dancers, drummers, and singers from all over the nation are on hand and their contributions intersperse the moments of formal ceremony.

At 4 p.m. today the California Indian education association will have presented the DQU with a $1000 contribution. From 5-7 and Indian-Chicano buffet will be served says Mrs. Thorpe, which is open to all those who have helped bring DQU about, and from 10 p.m. to 1 a.m. the pow wow and the fiesta will continue.

Master of ceremonies is Miss Abby Abinanti, UCD Law student, member of DQU's board of trustees and a Yurak Indian.


The paradoxes
A Yolo County jail tour
By WALT ADAMSON

WOODLAND - To the casual observer passing the Yolo County Jail here, the sprawling, one-story, glass and stone edifice would most likely be taken as just another modern office building, as evidence perhaps that the flagstone bureaucratization so familiar to places like Sacramento and Los Angeles had somehow finally found its way to Woodland.

The impression would seem confirmed if in passing the 814 North Street building, our observer turned up Third street and passed the older, governmental gothic style structure which upon its stolid fa├žade are chiseled the words "Yolo county jail."

If he should be curious enough to stop, walk up its dozen stone steps and inquire, he would find out that the "Yolo county jail" was indeed the Yolo county jail for 54 years, until June 21, 1969, when officially it bequeathed its ring of cell keys to its elaborate $1,290,000 new neighbor.

The new jail, he would be told, was a proud civic achievement which incorporated almost every modern technological device to insure that no one would ever break out of it, that no one, probably would even try. It was just about the perfect jail.

Nonetheless, that perfection is in the eye of the beholder is amply demonstrated by the mild winds of protest which recently passed through the chambers of the Yolo county board of supervisors.

That very same security marvel which stood across Third street from the Yolo county courthouse was in a word, "inhuman." The charge was made by two Sacramento women who wrote to the supervisors that a number of harsh jail regulations had been revealed to them by acquaintances they had who were in it, locked up.

Specifically, they charged, meals were inadequate, no physical outdoor activity was scheduled, and conditions were avoidably and unduly harsh because radios were not allowed and mattresses were taken away from the men at 5 a.m. each day and not returned until 8 p.m.

Last Monday, Sheriff James Cameron replied to the charges by denying the food allegation and claiming the other rules were necessary to preserve order and quiet.

The following day this reporter was taken on a tour of the jail premises by Captain Joseph Lawrence, a veteran of 25 years on the Oakland police force, and now the personnel training officer for the Yolo county sheriffs.

We began with the wing that faces out to the corner of Third and North, the wing that houses
(Continued on page 4)

[[image]]
Chamber Memo
By Derald Gibson
Manager Davis Area Chamber of Commerce

For an evening of fun there isn't much that exceeds attending a meeting of Sacramento Trade Club. Once each year Davis is allotted a block of tickets now on sale at the chamber office. The special occasion is that Davis will be honored city April 7. Mayor Asmundson will represent the City of Davis, Howard Goelz will represent the Chamber, Chancellor Meyer will be represented as will Dean Tupper. Tickets are $5.50 each and this includes the social hour, dinner, entertainment, and drawing for door prizes. Trade Club now meets at the Woodlake Inn rather than at Governor's hall. Please get your tickets now since all unsold tickets must be returned April 5.
[[line]]

Davis Family Night at Candlestick Park in San Francisco is May 14. The game is Giants versus Dodgers. Tickets and round-trip transportation by bus are $8.00 each and may be purchased at offices of the Pacific Telephone and Telegraph Company, 333 F Street in Davis. Dr. Q. Wendell Nickels is the mainspring that makes this annual trek to Candlestick possible. Over the years thousands of Davisites have enjoyed the affair.
[[line]]

A supply of Picnic Day brochures reminds us that this big annual event sponsored by the ASUCD is almost upon us-the date is April 17. This year's theme, "Memories of the past...A Challenge to the Future" suggests nostalgia and hope. You and your family are invited to attend and enjoy the parade, exhibits, melodrama, sheepdog trials, aquacade, fashion show, sports events, horse show, band concerts, campus tours, Dance, alumna reception.
[[line]]

A Newsletter just received from District 10 California Division of Highways contains the following report on construction projects on Interstate 80 near Davis in Solano County. Water Well near Dixon-A water well was drilled near Dixon in January 1971. This well will produce a suitable water supply for a future roadside rest. Pedrick Road to the Yolo County Line-The California Highway Commission has adopted the routing for the conversion of 4.6 miles of four-lane expressway to six and eight lane freeway standards from Pedrick Road to the Yolo Country line. This is the last remaining section of Interstate 80 between the San Francisco Bay and Sacramento to be converted to freeway standards. Design details and right of way acquisition matters are being worked out with the University of California at Davis. Putah Creek to the Yolo County Line-Funds have been budgeted for the first unit between Putah Creek and the Yolo County line. Construction should begin this summer on this $10.8 million project. Pedrick Road to Putah Creek-The unit between Pedrick Road and Putah Creek is being designed as a six-lane freeway to match the existing highway to the west. This $1.3 million project should be ready for advertising in about 18 months.
[[line]]

The main feature of the Board of Directors meeting April 6 will be a discussion about redevelopment with Mayor Vigfus Asmundson present to explain how the California redevelopment law might be applied to Davis. The chamber's Core Area Development committee chaired by Dorothy Briggs previously met with the Mayor to discuss the redevelopment idea.
[[line]]

Chamber members are encouraged to attend meetings of the Board of Directors. Meetings are held at 7 a.m. the first Tuesday of each month at Larry Blake's Restaurant.

Building permits treble

Building in Davis during the first quarter of 1971 proceeded at a rate almost three times faster than it did in the first quarter of 1970.

Statistics released yesterday from the city's building inspections department show that during March, 1971, permits were granted for construction and remodelling jobs valued at a fall $1,815,450. The figure overshadows the $766,410 worth of permits granted in February and overwhelms the $489,212 worth granted in January.

The total for the three months amounts to $3,071,072, which compares with only $1,109,360 in permits granted the first three months of 1970.

Also the figure for this March is over three times greater than the figure for last March, which was $513,250.

The majority of the permits taken out during the past 31 days were for 36 single family homes. The McKeon construction company also received permits for 17 of its quad-plexes, valued at $44,000 apiece, to go in the "La Buena Vida" subdivision north of Covell and east of Pole Line road. And the Brown construction company has permission to build one $35,000 duplex.

In the miscellaneous category, the Campbell company took out a permit for $80,000 worth of remodelling in the Intercoast life insurance building at 3820 Chiles Road.

Of the 36 permits granted for single homes, 16 were to Stanley Davis and associates for construction homes on Belmont drive, and one more on Tulip lane. The Stanley Davis homes ranged in valuation from three at $14,400 to a pair at $27,000.

The $14,400 Stanley Davis homes were the lowest in valuation of all the single family dwellings receiving permits. The highest in valuation is to be constructed by Streng Brothers at 1529 Notre Dame drive. It was assessed at $35,000.

Potential of the red buses
By PAT FULTON

That strange, oval shaped, three deck barge which plys the poison Hudson between the lower tip of Manhattan and Staten Island, from whence it gets its name, may be the most famous mass transportation facility in the world, but there is certainly nothing more unique than the ASUCD London bus system which rumbles along the streets of our very own Davis.

Guy VanCleve, the student managing the bus system this year, came to clamor club to explain it yesterday (and to make a little pitch for it too), and by the time the hour was up Clamorers were outclamoring VanCleve about the potential the system has for the town.

There are the moment three bus routs, VanCleve said,keyed mostly to higher density student apartment complexes for economy reasons.

One route goes to Sycamore lane to Covell boulevard, another goes out east Eighth past the Davis manor shopping center, and the third cuts off Eighth at F street to go to Fourteenth.

The first question thrown at him after his introductory remarks was pretty critical, out of the moth of devil's advocate Mike McBride. The busses
(Continued on page 14)


[[image]]
Chamber Memo
By Derald Gibson
Manager Davis Area Chamber of Commerce

For an evening of fun there isn't much that exceeds attending a meeting of Sacramento Trade Club. Once each year Davis is allotted a block of tickets now on sale at the chamber office. The special occasion is that Davis will be honored city April 7. Mayor Asmundson will represent the City of Davis, Howard Goelz will represent the Chamber, Chancellor Meyer will be represented as will Dean Tupper. Tickets are $5.00 each and this includes the social hour, dinner, entertainment, and drawing for door prizes. Trade Club now meets at the Woodlake Inn rather than at Governor's hall. Please get your tickets now since all unsold tickets must be returned April 5.
[[line]]

Davis Family Night at Candlestick Park in San Francisco is May 14. The game is Giants versus Dodgers. Tickets and roundtrip transportation by bus are $8.00 each and may be purchased at offices of the Pacific Telephone and Telegraph Company, 333 F Street in Davis. Dr. Q. Wendell Nickels is the mainspring that makes this annual trek to Candlestick possible. Over the years thousands of Davisites have enjoyed the affair.
[[line]]

A supply of Picnic Day brochures reminds us that this big annual even sponsored by the ASUCD is almost upon us - the date is April 17. This year's theme, "Memories of the Past...A Challenge to the Future" suggests nostalgia and home. You and your family are invited to attend and enjoy the parade, exhibits, melodrama, sheepdog trials, aquacade, fashion show, sports events, horse show, band concerts, campus tours, Dance, Alumni reception. 
[[line]]

A Newsletter just received from District 10 California Division of Highways contains the following report on construction projects on Interstate 80 near Davis in Solano County. Water Well near Dixon - A water well was drilled near Dixon in January 1971. This well will produce a suitable water supply for a future roadside rest. Pedrick Road to the Yolo County Line - The California Highway Commission has adopted the routing for the conversion of 4.6 miles of four-lane expressway to six and eight lane freeway standards from Pedrick Road to the Yolo County line. This is the last remaining section f Interstate 80 between the San Francisco Bay and Sacramento to be converted to freeway standards. Design details and right of way acquisition matters are being worked out with the University of California at Davis. Putah Creek to the Yolo County Line - Funds have been budgeted for the first unit between Putah Creek and the Yolo County line. Construction should being [[begin]] this summer on this $10.8 million project. Pedrick Road to Putah Creek - The unit between Pedrick Road and Putah Creek is being designed as a six-lane freeway to match the existing highway to the west. This $1.3 million project should be ready for advertising in about 18 months.
[[line]]

The main feature of the Board of Directors meeting April 6 will be a discussion about redevelopment with Mayor Vigfus Asmundson present to explain how the California redevelopment law might be applied to Davis. The chamber's Core Area Development committee chaired by Dorothy Briggs previously met with the Mayor to discuss the redevelopment idea.
[[line]]

Chamber members are encouraged to attend meetings of the Board of Directors. Meetings are held at 7 a.m. the first Tuesday of each month at larry Blake's Restaurant.

Weather
Lower Sacramento Valley: Fair through Saturday; high today 75-80; low tonight near 50; north winds 5-15 m.p.h. increasing to 15-30 m.p.h. by tonight.

Building permits treble

Building in Davis during the first quarter of 1971 proceeded at a rate almost three times faster than it did in the first quarter of 1970.

Statistics released yesterday from the city's building inspections department show that during March, 1971, permits were granted for construction and remodeling jobs valued at a full $1,815,450. The figure overshadows the $76,410 worth of permits granted in February and Overwhelms the $489,212 worth granted in January.

The total for the three months amounts to $3,071,072, which compares with only $1,109,360 in permits granted the first three months in 1970.

Also the figure for this March is over three times greater than the figure for last March, which was $513,250.

The majority of the permits taken out during the past 31 days were for 36 single family homes. The McKeon construction company also received permits for 17 of its quad-plexes, valued at $44,000 apiece, to go in the "La Buena Vida" subdivision north of Covell and east of Pole Line Road. And the Brown construction company has permission to build one $35,000 duplex.

In the miscellaneous category, the Campbell company took out a permit for $80,000 worth of remodeling the Intercoast life insurance building at 3820 Chiles Road.

Of the 36 permits granted for single homes, 16 were to Stanley Davis and associates for construction homes on Belmont drive, and one more on Tulip lane. The Stanley Davis homes ranged in valuation from three at $14,400, to a pair at $27,000.

The $14,400 Stanley Davis homes were the lowest in valuation of all the single family dwellings receiving permits. The highest in valuation is to be constructed by Streng Brothers at 1529 Notre Dame drive. It was assessed at $35,000.

Potential of the red buses

By PAT FULTON

That strange, oval shaped, three deck barge which plys the poison Hudson between the lower tip of Manhattan and Staten Island, from whence it gets its name, may be the most famous mass transportation facility in the world, but there is certainly nothing more unique than the ASUCD London bus system which rumbles along the streets of our very own Davis.

Guy VanCleve, the student managing the bus system this year, came to clamor club to explain it yesterday (and to make a little pitch for it too), and by the time the hour was up Clamorers were outclamoring VanCleve about the potential the system has for the town.

There are at the moment three bus routes, VanCleve said, keyed mostly to higher density student apartment complexes for economy reasons.

One route goes up Sycamore lane to Covell boulevard, another goes out east Eighth past the Davis manor shopping center, and the third cuts off Eighth at the F street to go to Fourteenth.

The first question thrown at him after his introductory remarks was pretty critical, out of the mouth of devil's advocate Mike McBride. The busses [[cut-off]]

(Continued on page 14)




  

Transcription Notes:
unfinished

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