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168 | THE CRISIS

[[column 1]] EXPENSES January 1 to December 31, 1916

Salaries ......... $ 5,053.04
General Expense and Supplies 1,419.25
Printing and Stationery ..... 1,319.88
Postage .............. 584.30
Traveling Expense .......... 558.20
Crisis subscriptions ........ 891.05
Advertising in THE CRISIS .... 184.45
Branches--proportion of membership fees...... 303.50
Branches--prizes for the 1915 membership contest ......... 243.85
Furniture and Fixtures ...... 90.16
Branch Bulletin--printing ... 59.50
Total expenditures from General Fund ....... $10,707.18

Special Funds
Maclean Memorial Fund ...... 13.80
Anti-Segregation Fund ...... 569.83
Anti-Lynching Fund--Cost of raising Fund ...... 1,203.73
Investigations and publicity 1,204.67
Federal Aid to Education Fund 245.63
Total expenditures from Special Funds ........ 3,237.66
Total of all Funds from January 1 to December 31, 1916 ................. 13,944.84

Cash Balance December 31, 1916--
General Fund .......... 1,880.46
Maclean Memorial Fund .... 270.57
Anti-Segregation Fund ....... 191.53
Anti-Lynching Fund ......... 9,131.24
Jim Crow Fund ................ 2.00
11,475.80

Report of the Director of Publications and Research, Dr. DuBois.
The work of this department has, as usual, been divided into three parts--the publication of THE CRISIS, lectures, and information.
The income of THE CRISIS for the year 1916 has been $28,721.36. The total number of copies sold has been 51,000. The average net paid circulation has been 37,625. In addition to this encouraging situation I have the pleasure to announce that the CRISIS is not only entirely self-supporting, paying every single item of its cost, including the salary of the editor and the salaries of all its employees, rent, light, heat, etc., but also in addition to this the business is entirely out of debt.

[[column 2]] Revenue and Expense Account, 1916

EXPENSES
Publishing ............. $12,150.80
Salaries ................ 7,618.40
General Expense ............ 2,324.75
Postage ................ 2,042.42
Stationery and Supplies ........ 937.03
Bad Debts ............... 1,693.59
Deprec'n on Furniture ........ 98.82
$26,865.81
NET PROFIT ................ 1,328.04
$28,193.85

REVENUE
Sales .................... $17,457.90
Subscriptions .............. 7,045.76
Advertising ................ 3,064.89
Profit on Books ............. 625.30
$28,193.85

Balance Sheet, December 31, 1916

ASSETS
Cash........... $ 207.75
Accts. Rec.--Advertisers ........ 1,486.67
"      " Agents ......... 2,403.19
"      " Books .......... 47.34
Books on hand ............. 167.20
Paper "  " .............. 577.38
Furniture and Fixtures ....... 1,877.63
$ 6,767.16

LIABILITIES
None on books

NET WORTH ............. $ 6,767.16
$ 6,767.16
The Nominating Committee reported the following names for members of the Board of Directors for the term expiring January, 1920: Miss Jane Addams, Chicago; Dr. C. E. Bentley, Chicago; Rev. Hutchins C. Bishop, New York; Dr. F. N. Cardozo, Baltimore; Dr. W. E. B. DuBois, New York; Mrs. Florence Kelley, New York; Miss Mary White Ovington, Brooklyn; Mr. Charles Edward Russell, Washington; Dr. John G. Underhill, Brooklyn; Miss Irene Lewissohn, New York. The entire ballot was elected.
The Budget Committee reported that its plan was to ask each branch to raise in


THE CALL OF THE PATRIOT  |  169

1917 just twice as much as it had in 1916, so as to cover the expense of the new organizer and the legal administration of the Association.
The Committee on the Annual Conference reported that the Governor of Ohio had consented to present the Spingarn Medal in Cleveland, the date of the Conference to be fixed later.
The CRISIS Committee reported that it had worked in conjunction with the editor upon those matters that concerned the CRISIS as an organ of the N. A. A. C. P.
The Legal Committee reported that it had concerned itself with a number of legal matters. Besides the segregation cases mentioned in the Chairman's report, the Committee had investigated, given advice, assistance, or directly aided in fighting discrimination and injustices in various forms. Chief among the cases of discrimination was that of Dr. Isabel Vandervall against the Syracuse Hospital for Women and Children, in which the committee secured a substantial offer of settlement.
Mr. Walling gave a brief outline of the work the Anti-Lynching Committee intends to do in its campaign against lynching, as follows:
1. To gather together all possible information concerning lynching.
2. Investigation in the field and publication of results.
3. Bringing cases before the courts whenever opportunity offers.
4. Making an effort to obtain favorable legislation.
The evening session was held in St. Philip's Church through the courtesy of Dr. Hutchins C. Bishop. Mr. Archibald H. Grimke presided. The session was devoted mainly to reports from branches. Mr. James W. Johnson, the new Field Secretary and Organizer, spoke on "Our Aim for 1917." Among other things, Mr. Johnson said, "The main duty before the Negro is to arouse and shake off his apathy to which perhaps fully one-half of his difficulties are due. As a race the Negro is very emotional. When that emotional power, which is now being frittered away, is compressed and directed through a channel, it is going to be one of the greatest powers possessed by the race for achieving its rights in this country."
The following resolution was passed:
IN MEMORIAM
"The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People has heard of the death of Mrs. Inez Milholland Boissevain and of that of Mr. Francis Jackson Garrison with a keen sense of irreparable loss, and it takes this occasion to express its profound and affectionate appreciation of their lives and of the value of their services to the cause of democracy and human brotherhood. They were both apostles of equality without distinction of race or color or sex and carried dauntlessly the banner of their lofty ideals through good report and evil in the midst of a hostile generation. They embodied in their conduct and character all that is precious and imperishable in the new gospel of peace on earth and freedom for all men.
"From us they have passed in the flesh, but within us they remain in their brave and undying love of justice and truth and--God helping us--they shall remain to inspire us ever to give of ourselves as they gave of themselves to the holy cause of liberty, equality and human brotherhood in America and in the world."
At the close of this session nine members of the Board of Directors met and the following officers were elected: Moorfield Storey, National President; Dr. J. E. Spingarn, Chairman of the Board of Directors; Oswald Garrison Villard, Treasurer; Dr. W. E. B. DuBois, Director of Publications and Research; Roy Nash, Secretary; Vice-Presidents: Archibald H. Grimke, Rev. John Haynes Holmes, John E. Milholland, Miss Mary White Ovington, Oswald Garrison Villard, Bishop John Hurst


THE CALL OF THE PATRIOT
BY FENTON JOHNSON

SEATED on the bench under the little arbor in the rear of their home, Mrs. Simpson was reading aloud the eulogy Wendell Phillips paid Toussaint L'Ouverture, the Negro revolutionist. Her little son, Garrison, a Negro child of the mulatto type with eager eyes and ears was listening to the glowing description of the black man's genius as a military leader and statesman despite his fifty years in bondage.
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