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8. Dr. J. C. Merriam, University of California:
The Exploration of Quaternary Caves in California. Illustrated with lantern slides.
9. Dr. Frederic Ward Putnam, Director of the Museum of Anthropology of the University of California, and Curator of the Peabody Museum of Harvard University:
Exhibition of Bones, Possibly Showing the Work of Man, from Quaternary Caves of California. Illustrated with lantern slides.
10. Mr. C. P. Mackie, Englewood, New Jersey:
A Plea for the More Critical Use of History in Anthropological Research.
11. Mr. S. A. Barrett, University of California:
Presentation of a Map Showing the Territory, Divisions, Villages and Camp-sites of the Pomo Indians of California. 
12. Dr. A. L. Kroeber, Secretary of the Department of Anthropology, University of California:
Systematic Nomenclature of American Ethnology.
13. Dr. C. Hart Merriam, Washington, D.C.
The Chievor of the Togva, a Mortuary Ceremony.
14. Dr. C. Hart Merriam, Washington, D.C.
Basket Cave-Burial in California.
15. Mr. P. S. Sparkman, Valley Centre, San Diego County, California:
The Grammar of the Luiseno Language of Southern California. 
16. Dr. Philip Mills Jones, Secretary and Editor of the Medical Society of the State of California:
Brief Description of a Method for Preserving Shell Specimens. 
17. Mrs. R. F. Herrick, Eureka, California:
Title to be announced. 
18. Mr. S. A. Barrett, University of California:
Basket Designs of the Pomo Indians. 
19. Dr. George Grant McCurdy, Yale University:
Eoliths from England and Belgium.
20. Dr. Charles Peabody and Warren K. Moorehead, Archaeological Museum of Phillips Academy, Andover, Massachusetts:
The Naming of Specimens in American Archaeology. 
21. Dr. P. E. Goddard, Department of Anthropology, University of California:
Mechanical Aids to the Study and Recording of Language. 
22. Dr. J. C. Merriam, University of California:
The Excavations at Emeryville Shellmound.  Illustrated with lantern slides.
23. Dr. J. C. Merriam, University of California:
Some Suggestions Concerning the Origin of Calaveras Skull.  Illustrated with lantern slides.
24. Mr. Charles Keeler, Berkeley:
Creation Myths and Folk Tales of the Manua Islands, Samoa. 
25. Mr. H. N. Rust, South Pasadena:
A Ceremony of the Mission Indians of Southern California. 
26. Dr. C. Hart Merriam, Washington, D.C.
Basketry of California Indians. 
27. Mr. Stewart Culin, Curator of Ethnology, Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences:
Title to be announced.
28. Mr. J. T. Goodman, Alameda:
The Maya Inscriptions and Codices.
29. Dr. George Bryon Cordon Curator of Ethnology and of American Archaeology, Free Museum o Science and art of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia:
Title to be announced.
30. Dr. Albert Ernest Jenks, Chief of the Ethnological Survey for the Philippine Islands, Manila:
The Peopling of the Philippines.
31. Dr. A. L. Kroeber, University of California:
Indian Systems of Consanguinity in California.
32. Professor W. H. Holmes, Chief of the Bureau of American Ethnology, Washington, D.C.
Title to be announced.
33. Miss Jeanne Elizabeth Wier, Nevada State University:
The Washoe Indians of Nevada.
34. Mr. James Mooney, Bureau of American Ethnology, Washington, D.C.
Title to be announced.
35. Mrs. Zelia Nuttall, Director of the Crocker Researches in Mexico for the Department of Anthropology of the University of California:
The Earliest Historical Communications Between Japan and Mexico, from Original Documents Preserved in the Archives of Japan, Recently Brought to Light by a Mexican Diplomat. 
36. Mr. F. W. Hodge, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.
Title to be announced.
37. Mr. Alcin Seale, Leland Stanford Junior University:
Ceremonies Relating to Sickness and Death in the Soloman Islands.
38. Dr. J. Swanton, Bureau of American Ethnology, Washington, D.C.:
Title to be announced.
39. Mr. C. C. Willoughby, Assistant Curator, Peabody Museum of Harvard University:
Specimens in the Peabody Museum Collected by the Lewis and Clark Expedition. 
Please note that the language and terminology used in this collection reflects the context and culture of the time of its creation, and may include culturally sensitive information. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution, but is available in its original form to facilitate research. For questions or comments regarding sensitive content, access, and use related to this collection, please contact transcribe@si.edu.