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It is worthy of note that, during the last six months a change of sentiment is apparent among the better classes of the South in regard to freedmen's schools.  Those of higher intelligence concede that education must become universal.  There are philanthropic and just men, who would cheerfully give this boon to all.  Many planters are convinced that it will secure to them more valuable and contented labor.  Some of the leading statesmen are urging that these millions will be a safer element in their midst if made moral and intelligent, and religious conventions over all the south have passed resolutions urging their membership to give instruction to the negroes. 
We have ourselves met prominent clergymen of the south in our colored schools - those even who favored the rebellion - where, after listening to the examinations, they acknowledged great surprise and satisfaction; and promised, on leaving, to give this educating work all their influence. 
It is true that many who favor such instruction, do it with the proviso that northern teachers shall no longer be sent; at least, that they themselves will assume the superintendence of the schools, proposing, in some instances, southern instructors. either white or colored.  All this may be called a new form of opposition. and its motive does seem ambiguous.  But if the State governments are ultimately to take upon themselves the education of these poor people, as they should, it is well they are making such a beginning.  We are sure that the improvement of their privileges by the freedmen, their elevation of character, and good conduct, as the consequence of instruction, will lead to the continuance of these privileges ultimately, from the best and highest motives.
We cannot conceal the fact that multitudes, usually of the lower and baser classes, still bitterly oppose our schools.  They will not consent that the negro shall be elevated.  He must, as they conceive, always remain of a caste in all essential respects beneath themselves.  They have been taught to believe this, and belief now is strengthened by both prejudice and passion.  Nothing, therefore, but military force for some time to come, ever on the alert and instantly available, will prevent the frequent outbreak of every form of violence.
The increasing interest which the great problem of education for the colored man is exciting among the best classes of our own country, and also among the leading philanthropists of Europe, has been very apparent during the last few months.  We are applied to for documents

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on the subject for use in England, Scotland, France, and indeed in almost every enlightened country in the old World.  Eminent gentlemen from abroad have assured us that it was with them the great question of the age; and terrible as our war has been, and weighty as are the political questions now agitating us, yet that on their return the chief inquires will be, " What is to become of these emancipated negroes?"  " Can they be educated?" Dr. McCOSH, of Edinburgh, during his recent stay in Washington, remarked with deep sadness on reaching too late one of our school-examinations, " Oh, what a loss! They kept me at the Patent Office looking at things I did not want to see, and so kept me from the very thing I came to America to see."
The following is a tabular view of the schools, teachers, and scholars, with the average attendance, and advancement in study, so far as we can obtain these last items.- Some of the Superintendents, as will be seen, wholly neglect to report them: 

[[9 columned table]]

STATES. | No. of Schools | No. of Teachers | No. of Scholars | Average attend'ce | No. in Alphabet | No. in Arithmetic | No. in Geography | Grammar & higher branches
Virginia | 123 | 200 | 11784 | 8951 |   |   |   |  
North Carolina | 119 | 135 | 9084 |   |   |  |   |  
South Carolina | 75 | 148 | 9017 | 6574 | 1725 | 4689 | 2631 | 222
Georgia | 79 | 113 | 7792 |   |   |   |   |
Florida | 38 | 51 | 2663 | 1212 | 172 | 445 | 180 | 
Alabama | 8 | 31 | 3338 | 3065 | 850 | 841 | 253 | 49
Mississippi | 50 | 80 | 5407 |   |   |   |   | 
Louisiana | 73 | 90 | 3389 | 2093 |   |   |   | 
Texas | 90 | 43 | 4590 |   |   |   |   | 
Arkansas, | 30 | 28 | 1584 | 1209 | 172 | 217 | 497 | 18
Kansas | 15 | 24 | 1500 |   |   |   |   | 
Missouri | 38 | 46 | 2698 |   |   |   |   | 
Kentucky* | 35 | 58 | 4122 | 3215 | 165 | 258 | 196 | 136
Tennessee | 42 | 125 | 9114 | 6279 | 1719 | 3214 | 1249 | 478
Maryland | 86 | 101 | 8144 | 5645 |   |   |   | 
District of Columbia | 74 | 132 | 6552 | 5004 | 799 | 1895 | 1768 | 182
Total. | 975 | 1405 | 90778 |   |   |   |   |  
*Studies reported in only five schools.

This table gives a total of nine hundred and seventy-five (975) schools, fourteen hundred and five (1405) teachers, and ninety thousand seven hundred and seventy-eight (90,778) pupils.  This does not include very many schools not reported - especially night-schools, and none of the large number of private schools, as well as Sabbath schools, now in operation.  We estimated in January that the entire educational census of the Bureau was 125,000
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