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00:22:44
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Transcription: [00:20:42]
{SPEAKER name="James Baldwin"}
We've got to figure out some way to get everybody else a job.

[00:20:46]
And we're not going to be able to do it, the way we're doing it now.

[00:20:51]
That's a fact, I'm sorry.

[00:20:57]
And as for freedom.

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I'll tell you what I know about freedom.

[00:21:04]
And I know people do not agree with this, and they think I don't have any political sense.

[00:21:10]
But I know that James Forman, for example, and Chico, for example,

[00:21:17]
are much, much freer

[00:21:21]
than most of the white people I know in this country.

[00:21:26]
For that matter, I am too.

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The reason is, I think the reason is,

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that in order to be free, lets look at some facts, the facts of your life very hard, an offense

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then to look, into you, and know who you are.

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At least know who you're not.

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And decide what you want, at least what you, will not, have

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and take it from there.

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People are as free, I find to say, as they wish to become.

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If one thinks of Americans in this way,

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it begins to be a very sinister matter.

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The way the word freedom is used here.

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Freedom is used here mainly as far as I can tell as a synonym for conflict.

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People seem to think they are free, because, they don't have a military machine oppressing them.

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And they overlook the fact, that there are many, many ways to lose your freedom

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and one of the simplest ways to lose it, is not through, not by military means, the simplest way to lose is to stop fighting for it.

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To stop believing in it. To stop respecting it.

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That is the way freedom goes and when it goes that way

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