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00:22:31
00:26:46
00:22:31

Transcription: [00:22:31]
[[coughing]]
[00:22:35]
[singing]
we've been 'buked and we've been scorned
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we've been talked about sure's you born
[00:22:55]
but we'll never turn back. no we'll never turn back, until we've all been freed and we have equality
[00:23:32]
we have walked through the shadows of death
[00:23:40]
we had to walk all by ourselves
[00:23:48]
but we'll never turn back. no we'll never turn back until we've all been freed and we have equality.
[00:24:22]
we have hung our heads and cried for those like Lee who died
[00:24:39]
died for you and died for me
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died for the cause of equality
[00:24:54]
but we'll never turn back. no we'll never turn back until we've all been freed and we have equality
[00:25:32]
and we'll have equality
[00:25:41]
[clapping]
[00:25:43]
{SPEAKER name="James Forman"}
[inaudible] I would like to point out one thing about this particular song.
[00:25:50]
Now there's Bertha Gober who sings with us
[00:25:56]
{SILENCE}
[00:25:56]
wrote that song in memorial of a man, in memorial of a man named Herbert Lee who was killed in Mississippi while working on voter registration.
[00:26:06]
and also that Bertha is ill right now and she's in the hospital and that we should give that a great deal of thought.
[00:26:14]
and Bertha's also written a couple of other songs that we've been singing throughout the movement all of us no doubt know "Oh Pritchett Oh Kelly" and of course "We'll Never Turn Back"
[00:26:25]
and there was another song she was working on called, um, I forget you know this song something about it be, uh, "blue Christmas without you" or something like that
[00:26:37]
well she was changing the words around 'till it, 'till it would be uh, "blue movement" you know "without you" and so on and on
[00:26:44]
and you know how the songs of the movement come about

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