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Transcription: [00:05:44]
And that was the day when four students, up in Greensboro, North Carolina, decided to sit down at a lunch counter.

[00:05:51]
And they sat down at that lunch counter, and they stayed there. Because they were tired of going into Greensboro, spending their money at a lunch counter, or rather spending their money in a five and ten cents store and unable to buy a cup of coffee.

[00:06:08]
It was an afront to their dignity. They became free the minute that they sat down at the lunch counter.

[00:06:15]
And all of those who have gone down and faced that white man at the courthouse have become free, the minute that you made that step,'cuz I know what it was like a year ago in Greenwood and you do too.

[00:06:27]
You said child, I ain't gonna fool with that mess. No, I ain't goin' to them meetin's. And when you came on out somethin' started movin' in you, you got religion!

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But you got a different kind of religion. You got a touch of the freedom religion when you start doing these things.

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Lo and behold the students began to organize, and somewhere down the line, the mantle of freedom touched upon Samuel Block and laid its hands upon Willie Peacock [[background talking, affirmative]]. and they came into Greenwood, Mississippi, in August of 1962.

[00:07:02]
And just think about that less than 14 months ago. It's important for us to remind ourselves of these historical facts.

[00:07:10]
'Cause some of us who are here may not have known that it was Samuel Block and Peacock comin' in here in 1962, August, sitting in the back of a... sleeping in the back of cars because they couldn't find any homes in which to sleep.

[00:07:26]
That's right. We were in Atlanta. We had to send them mail in a plain envelope addressed it to somebody else, because if the mail came through marked Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, they feared for their lives.

[00:07:39]
Some of you may have forgotten the fact that 8 white men came up the stairs over Burns Funeral Home, a rather photographic shot, with iron pipes in their hands and chains. And that the only way these guys got out was to jump down...

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