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CABLE ADDRESS: "NATSTU" NEW YORK

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INTERNATIONAL STUDIO
572 MADISON AVENUE
NEW YORK

March the twenty-fifth 
1930 [[margin]] TP [[/margin]]

Mrs. T.G. Parker
Jacques Seligmann & Co., Inc.
3 East 51 Street
New York City

Dear Mrs. Parker: 

You may recall my speaking to you on my last call of the special number which INTERNATIONAL STUDIO is publishing in May. The table of contents for this issue is now complete and I am sending you herewith a brief description of the contents of this issue.

The May issue of INTERNATIONAL STUDIO is an important one, because it is received by our readers at a time when thousands of them are planning trips to Europe. These American buyers of art are attracted to New York from all parts of the country and, after a stay of a week or ten days here, they go abroad to attend the art season on the Continent.

The May issue, as you may know, will have a number of unusual features. This issue is largely French in character and, for this reason, I believe will be of particular interest to Mr. Seligmann. Considerable space will be devoted to the celebration this year in Paris of the centenary of the Romantic School. Dr. Meier-Graefe is writing an article on Delacroix. Henry Russell Hitchcock, Jr., also contributes another article in reference to this celebration, entitled "Paris of the Romantics." "French Marquetry Furniture of the Eighteenth Century" will be discussed by Seymour de Ricci.

In addition to the many articles which will appear in this number, Frank Rutter, European Editor of INTERNATIONAL STUDIO, will publish a comprehensive resume of the important art events of the British and Continental summer season. This number of INTERNATIONAL STUDIO will be welcomed by important American art buyers who are planning to go abroad this year. 

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