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TABLE OF CONTENTS
INTERNATIONAL STUDIO
- May 1930 -

"WHAT HAS BECOME OF DELACROIX?"
by Julius Meier-Graefe

1930 is to witness the celebration in Paris of the centenary of the Romantic School. Delacroix, as leader of the movement in the field of painting, has been chosen for this article by Julius Meier-Graefe, the most distinguished critic of the French School of the nineteenth century. Dr. Meier-Graefe has written authoritative volumes on Corot, Cezanne, Renoir, Van Gogh, etc.

"FINE MARQUETRY FURNITURE OF THE 17th AND 18th CENTURIES"
by Seymour de Ricci

This article by the author of "Louis XIV and Regency," etc., will feature marquetry furniture in the collections of Lord Bearsted, Mr. Jules S. Bache, and others, and examples from the D'Abernon sale of last season.

"THE SILVER COLLECTION OF SIR J. H. B. NOBLE, Bart."
by E. Alfred Jones

The Noble collection of Edinburgh contains rare pieces of English, Irish and Scotch silver, many of which will be illustrated in the May INTERNATIONAL STUDIO. E. Alfred Jones, who contributes this article, is the author of "Old Silver of Europe and America."

"PARIS OF THE ROMANTICS"
by Henry Russell Hitchcock, Jr.

Another article in reference to the celebration in honor of the Romantic School will be "Paris of the Romantics" by Henry Russell Hitchcock, Jr. The article will be illustrated with old prints of Paris. Dr. Hitchcock, formerly of the art departments of Vassar and Harvard and now professor at Wesleyan University, is well-known as the author of "Modern Architecture."

"THE KING'S PICTURES"

As a special pictorial feature, a number of paintings in the Royal Collection will be shown by special arrangement with the Fine Arts Publishing Company of London, which has been publishing reproductions of the collection under the title of "The King's Pictures."

"THE USE OF MODERN FRENCH FABRICS"

This article treats of modern French textiles from the point of view of their use in decoration. The illustrations will show interiors in which they are employed as hangings and upholstery. The very latest designs from Paris will be included.
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