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[[caption]] A practical solution for an awkward problem: airlifting display signs to the top of the new Philips' building in Oslo.
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fourth month.  The consequent saving in time as compared with that involved when engineers had to rely upon surface transport needs no emphasis.

Ambulance and rescue work is a constant feature of the company's activities, the ability of the helicopter to alight in the most inaccessible places enabling it to fulfill many tasks which are beyond the scope of the conventional aeroplane.  In March, 1959, Helikopter Service A/S was called upon to undertake one of the longest flights in the history of air ambulance operations by helicopter when a patient required transport from Karasjok in the far north to hospital in Oslo.  A helicopter was essential owing to the nature of the terrain at Karasjok and the total flying time involved was more than thirteen hours.  But the patient reached hospital within ten hours of entering the helicopter instead of having to endure days of discomfort and delay by surface transport.

The company's base at Bodø is engaged in many of these ambulance flights, seventeen such operations north of the Arctic Circle having been carried out in the first half of 1959, and the nature of the work often necessitates flight in bad weather.

In the Winter of 1958-59 another task of a very different nature called for the services of the helicopter.  This, part of an advertising "stunt," called for the transport of 31 tonnes of ice on the first stage of a journey from the Arctic to the Equator.  The ice was airlifted from the Svartisen mountain area, north of the Arctic Circle, to the nearest accessible road in manageable blocks, which were then frozen together into one piece for conveyance by surface transport to the Equator via Oslo, Paris, and Algiers.  "Theirs not to reason why" — so long as it comes within the capabilities of the helicopter!

Sign-lifting is another aspect of advertising in which the company's helicopters have been engaged, the task being to raise the letters of large signs or advertisements to the tops of high buildings in Oslo and Bergen.  The transport of telegraph poles is yet another field in which Helikopter Service A/S specialises.  The poles are delivered to the exact location for subsequent erection, sometimes at heights of up to 1200 metres (3,940 feet) above sea level, at a cost which is low compared with other methods of transport.

Survey and associated work carried out by the company has included definition of the Norwegian/Swedish border for the Norwegian Geographical Society by laying out white sheets at border stones and on peaks in the border area in preparation for subsequent photography by aeroplanes.  During 1957 and 1958 some 250

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[[caption]] Colletcing rock samples for the Norwegian Geographical Society
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[[caption]] As part of an advertising "stunt" Helikopter Service A/S collected a consignment of 3½ tonnes of virgin ice in the Svartisen mountains for eventual delivery to the Equator.  An indigenous Lapp ponders upon the strange habits of modern man.
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