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EXT. HUNTING WOODS - LANDSDOWN COUNTY - NIGHT 1. 

It is a clear but Autumn night at some time in the nineteen thirties. The Landsdown Woods are an assortment of various elements of nature; quiet water stream, rushing rives, heavy brushland, small trees, and the more dominant, great tall pines. NATHAN LEE MORGAN, a Black man in his late thirties or early forties, treks deep into the woods with his eleven year old son, DAVID LEE, and his hound dog, SOUNDER. Nathan Lee is a well built, strong manner of a man with a deliberate and quiet manner - David Lee, like his father is tall and strong with big, bright active eyes. SOUNDER, their hound dog, is a mixture of red-bone hound and bulldog, with great square jaws.

TITLES BEGIN

Nathan Lee carries an old rifle, and a burlap sack thrown across his shoulder - David Lee walks with a lantern as Sounder tracks ahead of them. They keep moving until they come upon a quiet river stream --

2. EXT> RIVER STREAM - NIGHT 2.

They walk along the edges of the rier, with deliberation. It is obvious that they have walked this route many times. They reach a cut-off point and circle back into the woods, and pick-up a pathway --

3. EXT. PATHWAY - NIGHT 3.

They pick up speed in close approach to a weeded area and stop. David looks about in disappointment. Sounder scratches the earth - Nathan looks out into the darkness with a nagging expression on his face -- 

TITLE INTERUPTED

DAVID LEE
There ain't no possums in this woods tonight, Daddy. 

NATHAN LEE
Looks that way, son. Guess the cold done drove most of em' down to the big water country - but if there's one left out here - we gotta find him. 

DAVID LEE
It's cold, Daddy!

CONTINUED
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