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[[Image]] MEN OF THE MONTH L.R. Lattmer-'11 

A COMPOSER.

  Twice this year a colored composer has led a white orchestra in a prominent New York playhouse.  In another land and in another age this would be but 

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J. ROSAMOND JOHNSON 

natural, for J. Rosamond Johnson, notwithstanding his Negro blood, is a composer whose music is known everywhere.  "Under the Bamboo Tree," "Lazy Moon," the "Congo Love Song" - all these and many more songs are his.  Johnson was born in Jacksonville, Fla., in 1873; studied at the New England Conservatory of Music, and then came to New York.  He has developed a new and distinct school of Negro music, has written light opera for Klaw & Erlanger, songs for May Irwin, Lillian Russell and Anna Held, and set Dunbar to rare music.  His long partnership with the gifted Bob Cole is well known.  All things considered, he stands as the most versatile composer of colored America and one of the striking musical geniuses of the land.

TWO TEACHERS.

  We present this month the pictures of two teachers, Harriet E. Clifford and Bessie B. Bruington.  The first was white from Maine, In the extreme East.  The second is colored and works in the extreme West, California. 
  Harriet Clifford was a New England teacher, who gave her life to Negro education in Georgia and died of tuberculosis last summer.  She was an accomplished musician, and gave the best years of her life to Atlanta University; not simply as a teacher, but as the friend and companion of her hundreds of pupils.
  Miss Bruington is a graduate of the Los Angeles State Normal School.  In the examination for teachers she stood seventh in a total of 300 persons examined, was appointed to teach in the Fifty-first Street public school.  Her four fellow teachers are white and her pupils are of both races.

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MISS BESSIE B. BRUINGTON

MEN OF THE MONTH

191

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THE LATE DOCTOR SALE       THE LATE BISHOP GAINES

TWO LOST LEADERS.

  In the passing of Wesley John Gaines, sixteenth bishop of the African M. E. Church, the Negro race has lost a striking and powerful figure.  Bishop Gaines was a blood relative of Robert Toombs and was born in slavery in 1840.  He had no opportunity for education, but became a shrewd leader, and latterly the most active constructive force in his church.
  In the same city with Bishop Gaines lived for many years Dr. George E.

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THE LATE MISS CLIFFORD

Sale, as president of the Atlanta Baptist College and later as superintendent of Baptist institutions for colored people throughout the South.  He was a white Canadian, a friend of both races in the South, and far more successful than is usual in maintaining pleasant and helpful social relations with both.  His premature death is a great loss to the statesmanship of the day.

A PRIZE WINNER.
  R. W. Overton. a sixteen-year-old student of the Stuyvesant High School, has recently won the long-distance record for model aeroplanes over the twenty competitors from all the high schools of Greater New York and vicinity.

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REGINALD W. OVERTON



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