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A Trip to Waltonia
"The Proposed Colored Colony of Character and Culture"—And Some Impressions
By ALBON L. HOLSEY
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"Realizing that the home-loving colored citizens of this section have in many instances been defrauded and discriminated against, and for that reason are more or less skeptical about real estate propositions, we not only invite, but urge every prospective purchaser of lots in Waltonia to make a most rigid investigation of our property, titles and business methods."

In this frank manner Mr. Furlow addressed me concerning Waltonia, the colored colony which is being promoted by the Rosalind Realty Co., and extended me an invitation to visit the place.

The trip to Potter, N. J., where Waltonia is located, was about forty-five minutes from Hudson Terminal. The day was ideal and my first impulse, when stepping down from the train, was to take a deep breath of the pure air and then a romp up the "big road" as I used to do "down home."

Within a stone's throw of the station a clear, sparkling brooklet winds its way among grass-covered knolls and shade trees. A nearby spring completes Nature's suggestion that this part of Waltonia would make a splendid park and playground for children—and, by the way, I now recall that a park is included in the plans of the promoters.

We followed the "big road" up a gradual incline for about three hundred yards until a stretch of table land opened before us which, with the exception of one depression, was as smooth as a parlor floor, high and dry, with splendid natural drainage and a pleasing view of the surrounding country.

"Gentlemen," said Mr. Bradshaw, our genial guide, "this is Waltonia." He then pointed to lots purchased by Dr. W. H. Brooks, Mr. J. W. Rose, Dr. Sterling, Rev. Timms and many others whose names I do not recall. He showed us the water main which passes through the center of the proposed colony and where the electric and telephone wires pass, assuring future residents of Waltonia all the comforts of city life.

One thing that impressed me about Waltonia, aside from the natural beauty which surrounds it, was its proximity to such cities as Plainfield, Rahway and Newark, affording social intercourse with a well-to-do, prosperous class of colored people in these cities and nearby shopping and theatre centers.

Thousands of people who live in Plainfield work in New York City and make the two trips daily on commuters' tickets. Residents of Waltonia may travel on these commuters' tickets to New York at a net cost of 25 1/3 cents per round trip.

In their prospectus I find the following interesting paragraph:

"And to that end we propose to sellour lots upon easy terms, with moderate monthly payments, without interest or taxes,, and when fully paid for to furnish a deed guaranteed by the Middlesex Title Guarantee and Trust Co., of New Bruswick, N. J., and when desired we will lend our assistance toward securing the cheapest money for building purposes to be had in the city."

Hence with such a program in connection with the proerty they own, affording as it does the foundation for a splendid city, there is no reason why Waltonia should not grow and flourish like the proverbial "green bay tree," especially as it is the only one of New York's hundred or more suburbs inviting colored residents, and any colored home seeker or investor will do well to look into the matter carefully before investing or locating elsewhere.
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Address for literature:
ROSALIND REALTY CO., Inc.
27 WILLIAM STREET                               NEW YORK
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Mention THE CRISIS



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THE CRISIS
A RECORD OF THE DARKER RACES
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PUBLISHED BY THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF COLORED PEOPLE, AT 26 VVESEY STREET, NEW YORK CITY
Conducted by W. E. Burghardt Du Bois
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Contents for June, 1913
COVER PICTURE. By Vincent Ellsworth Saunders
                                                    Page
CARTOON. By Lorenzo W. Harris.......................  80

ARTICLES
PLACIDO. Poet and Martyr. By José Clarana...........  82

AN OATH OF AFRO-AMERICAN YOUTH. By Kelly Miller.....  92

DEPARTMENTS
ALONG THE COLOR LINE................................  59

MEN OF THE MONTH....................................  72

OPINION.............................................  74

EDITORIAL...........................................  78

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF
COLORED PEOPLE......................................  85

WHAT TO READ........................................  92

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Entered as Second-class Matter in the Post Office at New York, N. Y.
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