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58      THE CRISIS ADVERTISER

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AMERICAN SERVICE SCHOOL
Instruction Department
80 Fifth Avenue - - - New York City


CALLING CARDS
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One dozen neatly written calling cards, plain or fancy, 15c.; with handsome aluminum card case, 30c. postpaid. Comic cards, 20c. per dozen. Memorial cards, 20c. per dozen. Orders carefully executed on day received.
WM. I. THOMAS
Penman
2720 West Lake Street
Chicago, Ill.


OF INTEREST TO VOCAL STUDENTS
[[image - drawing of a book]] 
TONE-PLACING AND VOICE-DEVELOPMENT
BY PEDRO T. TINSLEY

Tone Placing and Vocal Development

Practical method of singing for daily practice, based upon artistic principles, together with a carefully prepared number of exercises.

From "Musical Courier," N. Y.: A very practical little book is "Tone Placing and Voice Development," by Pedro T. Tinsley. It contains some very excellent material and vocal exercises, and should be in the hands of all vocal students.

WORDS OF APPRECIATION
I offer you the heartiest possible endorsement of your work, which I believe to be the most complete course of the kind that has ever come under my notice.——Glenn Dillard Gunn, Chicago "Tribune."

From "Music News," Chicago, Ill.: Accordingly his "Practical Method of Singing" is a most concise and practical little manual, containing many valuable vocal exercises. It cannot fail to be helpful to all ambitious vocal students.
CANNOT FAIL OF GOOD RESULTS
The work is especially commendable because it treats in a clear and systematic manner all the vital points so essential to the student, making it easy for him to advance to the highest point of development.——Geo. I. Holt, Des Moines, Iowa.
PRICE $1.00
Address the publisher:
PEDRO T. TINSLEY
6448 Drexel Avenue  CHICAGO, ILL.


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Agents to handle THE CRISIS in all sections of the country. Splendid opportunity for money-making and dignified employment.
Address
THE CRISIS
26 Vesey Street - - New York

Mention THE CRISIS.

THE CRISIS
Vol. 6—No. 2     JUNE, 1913     Whole No. 32
[[image - ALONG THE COLOR LINE]]

EDUCATION.
"I WENT to school in the South six months of the year and pent three of the months in preparation for the closing exercises," said Mr. Joseph C. Manning, of Alabama, at the recent conference of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in Philadelphia.  Mr. Manning has reason to be thankful for small mercies.  He is white.  Black children in Alabama are not able to say what he has said.  For instance, in Wilcox County, there was expended in 1910 $9,339.70 for the education of $10,758 Negro children and $30,612.75 for that of 2,000 white children.  These figures show a per capita expenditure of 82 cents for the Negro child and $15.50 for the white.

In consequence of this condition of affairs the conference on rural industrial schools for Negroes, which took place in April in New York, resolved to make a uniform organized effort to collect money in the North for the support of these schools instead of the haphazard rivalry which has heretofore existed.  The conference also decided to attempt to equalize the standard of these schools.  The conference is to assemble in November, and the following officers were elected:
William H. Holtzclaw, Utica Institute, president;  Leslie P. Hill, Manassas, Va., secretary-treasurer;  Miss Emma Wilson, Myersville, S. C., vice-president.

Fisk University, Nashville, Tenn., is in urgent need of $104,000 to meet the requirements of the General Education Board in the raising of $500,000 for its work.  Contributions of $1 or more are requested and may be sent to the director of the university.

The New Orleans school board has vacancies for fifty colored teachers to replace the white teachers in colored schools.  Persons desiring information about examinations for these positions should communicate with  Guillame College, 407 Pythian Temple.

Efforts are on foot to establish a Negro industrial school in Dallas, Tex.

The color school children of Cumberland County, N. C., have contributed the largest single amount by school children to the fund for a monument to the late Governor Aycock.

Dr. I. Garland Penn, corresponding secretary of the Freedmen's Aid Society, has organized a campaign to raise $500,000 for Negro education at institutions in the South.

Dr. Elmer E. Brown, former United States Commissioner of Education and present chancellor of New York University, urgers Federal aid for Negro education.  He says: "Sooner or later it will become clear that here is a national need of such magnitude that it can be met only by the aid of national resources."

A new school for colored children in South Chattanooga, Tenn., is to cost $15,000.

The John F. Slater Fund expended during the past year $7,375 in aid of Negro education in South Carolina.
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