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58        THE CRISIS ADVERTISER 

TALLADEGA COLLEGE

40 Teachers and Workers               
Over 600 Students            
Rev. F. A. SUMNER, President     
TALLADEGA, ALABAMA
A School for Training Leaders       
Positive Christian Influence
EQUIPPED FOR STANDARD WORK IN ALL DEPARTMENTS
Twenty Buildings
Electric Light
Steam Heat
Hot and Cold Water    
Four Laboratories
Library of  16000 Volumes
Pipe Organ
Model Farm          
Modern Hospital
Athletic Field
Good Board
Expense Low
Departments and Courses 
Scientific
Classical
Education
Theological
Bible Institute
Academy
Conservatory of Music
Agriculture
Domestic Science and Arts
Nurse Training
Manual Training
Printing
For Catalog and Information, address
THE DEAN, Room 21, Talladega, Alabama


THE FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
Tallahassee, Florida 
Offers long and short courses in Mechanic Arts, in Home Economics, in Agriculture, in Education and in Science 
For Catalog Address 
NATHAN B. YOUNG, President
P. O. DRAWER 524


ST. MARY'S SCHOOL
An Episcopal boarding school for girls, under the direction of the Sisters of St. Mary
Address:
THE SISTER-IN-CHARGE
609 N. 43d St. 
W. Philadelphia, Pa.


CLARK UNIVERSITY 
ATLANTA, GA.
Four years Academy or High School.
Five years Normal Course.
Two years Pre-Medical Course.
Four years College (A. B.) Course.
$75 to $125 pays necessary expenses for a year.
Harry Andrews King, President.


HARTSHORN MEMORIAL COLLEGE
RICHMOND, VIRGINIA
A superior school for the separate, higher education of young women. Select Courses of study, Industrial, Music, Preparatory, Classical, Normal and College. Provides a pleasant home, careful culture and thorough training.
Expenses very moderate.
Send for Catalog to the President.


MORGAN COLLEGE AND BRANCHES
John O. Spencer, President
MORGAN COLLEGE, Baltimore, Md.
LOCATION: Central, in great college town between North and South.
COURSES: Preparatory, normal, music, advanced education, collegiate, —appropriate degrees.
INSTRUCTORS: College and university trained. Seven colleges and universities represented in faculty.
DORMITORIES: For a limited number, furnished.
TERMS: Very reasonable.
DEAN: William Pickens, Lit.D.
PRINCESS ANNE ACADEMY, Princess Anne, Md.
(The Eastern Branch of the Maryland State College of Agriculture.)
LOCATION: The famous Eastern Shore of Maryland, Somerset County.
COURSES: Preparatory, normal, industrial, domestic science, music.
INSTRUCTORS: College and technically trained.
DORMITORIES: Carefully supervised, furnished.
TERMS: Free tuition; other expenses moderate.
PRINCIPAL: Rev. Thomas H. Kiah, A. M.
SUMMER SCHOOL FOR TEACHERS: June 25th to August 3rd.
VIRGINIA COLLEGIATE AND INDUSTRIAL INSTITUTION, Lynchburg, Va.
LOCATION: On beautiful hill, suburbs of growing city.
COURSES: Preparatory, normal, domestic science, gardening, music.
INSTRUCTORS: College trained; carefully selected.
DORMITORIES: Furnished; steam heat; accommodations for fifty girls; carefully supervised.
TERMS: Within the reach of all.
PRINCIPAL: Lee M. McCoy, A. M.
ALL SCHOOLS OPEN SEPTEMBER 25, 1917


STORER COLLEGE 
FOUNDED 1867
A co-educational institution. State Normal, College Preparatory, Musical and Manual Training Courses. Magnificent location; modern, well equipped buildings, laboratories, fine library; inter-school debates, declamatory contests, athletics, literary societies, Christian atmosphere. Educational ideals high.
Address
HENRY T. MCDONALD, President
Harpers Ferry, W. Va.
Educational Institutions continued on page 94.

Mention THE CRISIS


THE CRISIS
Vol. 14—No. 2
JUNE, 1917
Whole No. 80

Editorial

RESOLUTIONS OF THE WASHINGTON CONFERENCE.

The representatives of Negro organizations embracing many millions of men, together with their friends and fellow workers of other races, deem it fitting for the twelve million Americans of Negro descent and for many other millions resident in America, in Africa, and in the islands of the sea.

We trace the real cause of this world war to the despising of the darker races by the dominant groups of men, and the consequent fierce rivalry among European nations in their effort to use darker and backward people for purposes of selfish gain regardless of the ultimate good of the oppressed.

We see permanent peace only in the extension of the principle of government by the consent of the governed, not simply among the smaller nations of Europe but among the natives of Asia and Africa, the Western Indies and the Negroes of the United States.

Despite the unfortunate record of England, of Belgium, and of our own land in dealing with colored peoples, we earnestly believe that the greatest hope for ultimate democracy, with no adventitious barriers of race and color, lies on the side of the Allies, with whom our country has become companion in arms. In justification of this belief we point on the one hand to the splendid democracy of France, the recent freeing of our fellow-sufferers in Russia, and the slow but steady advance of principles of universal justice in the British Empire and in our own land; and on the other hand we point to the wretched record Germany and Africa and her preachment of autocracy and race superiority.

We, therefore, earnestly urge our colored fellow citizens to join heartily in this fight for eventual world liberty; we urge them to enlist in the army; to join in the pressing work of providing food supplies; to labor in all ways by hand and thought in increasing the efficiency of our country. We urge this despite our deep sympathy with the reasonable and deep-seated feeling of revolt among Negroes at the persistent insult and discrimination which they are subject and will be subject even when they do their patriotic duty.

Let us, however, never forget that this country belongs to us even more than to those who lynch, disfranchise, and segregate. As our country it rightly demands our whole-hearted defense as well today as when with Crispus Attucks we fought for independence and with 200,000 black soldiers we help hammer out our own freedom.

Absolute loyalty in arms and in civil duties need not for a moment lead us to update our just complaints and just demands. Despite the gratuitous advice of the white friends who wish us to submit uncomplainingly to caste and peonage, and despite

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