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162     The Crisis Advertiser 

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1870   Clark University   1917 
South Atlanta Georgia 

Most beautiful campus of 70 acres, commodious buildings with modern conveniences. High Scholarship — Talented Faculty — Well equipped library and laboratories—Literary societies—Athletics—Co-educational—Expenses very low. $100 per year of eight months will pay tuition, board, room, etc. 
Comfortable dormitories with steam heat and gas light. 

Courses of Study 
Domestic Science for girls, cooking, sewing, dressmaking and embroidery. 
Pre-Academy—7th and 8th grades. 
Academy—Four years with diploma. 
Pre-Medical—Two years above academy. 
College—Four years leading to A.B. degree. 
Normal—Five years above grades with diploma. 

First Semester opens October 3, 1917. 
Harry Andrews King, President, 
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THE WEST VIRGINIA COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE
NEAR CHARLESTON, W. VA.

One of the leading schools in the United States for the eduation of Negro youth. Healthful surroundings, fine dormitory facilities, expenses low, strong faculty.

For catalog address
BYRD PRILLERMAN, A. M., Pres., Institute, W. Va.
[[/advertisement]]

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THE FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
Tallahassee, Florida

Offers long and short courses in Mechanic Arts, in Home Economics, in Agriculture, in Education and in Science.

For catalog address
NATHAN B. YOUNG, President[?]
P. O. Drawer 524
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[[advertisement]]
ST. MARY'S SCHOOL

An Episocpal boarding school for girls, under the direction of the Sisters of St. Mary.

Address:
THE SISTER-IN-CHARGE
609 N. 43d St.      W. Philadelphia, Pa.
[[/advertisement]]

[[advertisement]]
HARTHSHORN MEMORIAL COLLEGE
RICHMOND, VIRGINIA

A superior school for the separate, higher education of young women. Select Courses of study, Industrial, Music, Preparatory, Classical, Normal and College. Provides a pleasant home, careful culture and thorough training.

Expenses very moderate.
Send for Catalog to the President. 
[[/advertisement]]

[[advertisement]] 
1867   Howard University   1917
      
Stephen M. Newman, A. M., D. D.,
President.

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
A. B. and B. S. COURSES

TEACHERS' COLLEGE
A. B. and B. S. Courses in Education

SCHOOL OF MANUAL ARTS AND APPLIED SCIENCES
B. S. Courses in
Engineering,
Home Economics,
Manual Arts.

CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC
Mus. B. Courses

ACADEMY
Two Preparatory Courses:
Classical,
Scientific

COMMERCIAL COLLEGE
Secretarial Course,
Accounting Course,
General Course.

LIBRARY TRAINING CLASS

PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS

SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY
B. D. Courses,
Diploma Course.

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE
M. D. Courses in Medicine,
D. D. S. Courses in Dentistry,
Phar. D. Courses in Pharmacy.

SCHOOL OF LAW
LL. B. Courses

For catalog, address:
HOWARD UNIVERSITY,
Washington D. C. 
[[/advertisement]]

Educational Institutions continued on pages 199 and 200

Mention THE CRISIS



THE CRISIS
Vol. 14-No. 4      
AUGUST, 1917     
Whole No. 82

Editorial

THE WORLD LAST MONTH

THIS is the day of graduation. Nearly five hundred of us march from college, followed by fully 2,500 colored high school graduates. How splendid a showing. Their pictures came to us so fast that we have to apologize for omitting those of the professional men and most of the high school students.-The Spingarn camp at Des Moines is in full blast. All honor to the man who proposed it.-The war is on. The nation's life is up-turned. We do our bit in spite of discrimination on all hands.-The "Bar Sinister" is another attempt to bring the Negro problem into the moving pictures. It, of course, leaves something to wish, but it is the finest and fairest yet.-A report on education for Negroes is announced by the U. S. Bureau of Education. With rare forethought the review is sent out before the books are published, which is one way to arrange public opinion.-National prohibition is coming. Let it come.-The United States is attempting to deny Asia to the Asiatics, but it is only attempting. The demands of Japan will yet be recognized and China is not fool enough to regard the United States as her friend with the Chinese exclusion act on her statue books.

A PROTEST FROM THE ORIENT.

I HAVE been deeply affected by the account of the racial riots in the mid-west. During my visit to this country, within the last three years I have seen many evidences of blind race and color prejudice of the worst possible kind, but the present has exceeded all precedents. To think of women and girls maltreating, beating with shoes, dragging and otherwise belaboring their sisters of the colored community, simply because of their color, is something for which even I was not prepared. It has shocked me beyond description. In my country, men in the country have many times been treated as if we belonged to your community, but that never angered me so much, as I have never had much faith in the veneer of civilization and universal brotherhood and love for democracy, which the people of European descent put on. In my humble judgment, the people have yet to learn the meaning of MANLINESS. At present, intoxicated with power, brute force in their eyes stands for manliness. Just think of numbers of men attacking, shooting and burning stray men and women in one's and two's. That is modern chivalry and bravery. Armed men killing unarmed men and women, girls of seventeen and eighteen beating in public the aged members of their own sex. CIVILIZED MEN AND WOMEN burning people alive. I am afraid, being an alien being here only by courtesy, I cannot raise my voice against these brutalities openly. It has shocked me very much to find that so far, with the exception of the Evening Post, the Press has taken no editorial notice of the outrage. Of course the best minds of the country will condemn the wrong, but I wonder if the attitude of the Press would have been the same if the victims had been the whites instead of the colored. Oh for the cursed vandalism! There can be no democracy and no  
    

Transcription Notes:
It was perfect except 1 simple accidental keyboard press extra letter. I felt bad I had to reopen. Sry :/

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