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168 THE CRISIS

raise so large a sum needed the combined help of our United Womanhood and she immediately enlarged the committee to fifty with Mrs. S. Joe Brown of Des Moines, Iowa, as general chairman, authorizing each one to use her influence to raise all of the money she could, so that we might report the entire indebtedness wiped out by one day's work.
At a meeting of the Trustees, held in June, the entire board signified their willingness to resign and place entire control in the hands of the National Association.
On June 30, Mrs. Talbert signed the check for $2,100 for payment of one-half of the mortgage and interest. Money sent to Mrs. Nettie L. Napier, Special Treasurer, was forwarded to Mrs. Ida Joyce Jackson, National Treasurer.
The first large contribution came from Miss Meta Pelham of Detroit, Mich., $220. The largest amount up to date has been sent in by a committee working under the leadership of Mrs. Addie W. Hunton and Miss Maricha R. Lyons of Brooklyn, N. Y., $380.
Donations have been sent in by local race men and women all over the country. The National Association will publish the honor roll, giving names of individuals and amount sent in by each.
The names of many prominent race men and women are still lacking, but we hope to hear from them before the roll is closed. We again make this appeal and urge all men and women who wish to honor the name and memory of Frederick Douglass to arise and in one mighty effort wipe out the mortgage and restore the home.
Here will be preserved all interesting relics pertaining to slavery. The table upon which Charles Sumner wrote his "Civil Rights Bill" is here. Here will also be seen the two famous violins of Mr. Douglass and many other interesting relics.
Let me say again to the great American Negro, "Love your race." No Negro should be an indifferent spectator. We should all co-operate in sustaining the hands of the National Association of Colored Women in the preservation of this site. Every loyal race-loving Negro should take an active, personal interest in everything that concerns the welfare of our race in America.
The name of every club or individual which sens $25 will be placed upon parchment and hung upon the walls of the home. For the largest donor, either club or individual, there will be erected a tablet to show to posterity the names of men and women who showed their loyalty by dollars and cents as well as by talk.

Alabama...$2.00
Arkansas...28.63
Arizona......
California...95.35
Colorado...39.98
Connecticut...13.00
Delaware...2.50
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA......
Florida...26.26
Georgia...3.50
Idaho......
Illinois...137.53
Indiana...33.06
Iowa...25.00
Kentucky...139.41
Kansas...12.70
Louisiana...10.00
Maine......
Maryland...9.00
Massachusetts...101.33
Michigan...268.00
Minnesota...15.00
Mississippi......
Missouri...7.45
Montana...25.00
Nebraska......
Nevada......
New Hampshire......
New Jersey...80.16
New Mexico......
New York...472.07
North Carolina...55.18
North Dakota......
Ohio...146.34
Oklahoma...17.00
Oregon...25.00
Pennsylvania...93.50
Rhode Island...50.00
South Carolina...172.05
South Dakota......
Tennessee...118.49
Texas...25.57
Utah......
Vermont......
Virginia...10.17
Washington...9.00
West Virginia...2.25
Wisconsin...25.00
Wyoming......
Households of Ruth...98.72

Total Receipts...$2,395.20
Paid on mortgage...$2,000.00
Paid on interest...100.00

If you have not given send to-day to 
Mrs. Nettie L. Napier,
120 Fifteenth Avenue, North,
Nashville, Tennessee.


IDLEWILD

SLOWLY there are growing up here and there throughout the United States summer resorts, which are especially for colored folk. One of the most recent is Idlewild, Michigan. One leaves Chicago by boat at night, arriving at Ludington in the

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THE BEST SUMMER I EVER SPENT 169

morning. Thirty miles east of Ludington is Baldwin, the county seat of Lake County, where there are numbers of beautiful lakes full of bass, blue gills, perch and mascalonge. Here and there are trout streams and the woods abound in partridges, quail, rabbits and deer. Three miles east of Baldwin, on one of the prettiest of the lakes, is Idlewild.
Idlewild has a club house with reading, music and dining rooms and verandas for dancing. A number of cottages have been built and a tent city with board floors which serves as a hotel. The club house and tent city are on an island known as Island Park. Pretty rustic bridges connect the island with the mainland. One may enjoy golf, tennis, croquet, baseball, boating and fishing. Intoxicating liquors are prohibited, but there is plenty of exhilaration in the air. Persons who have visited Idlewild declare that it is one of the prettiest spots that they have ever seen.
Michigan, howeverm is too far for many of us, and often for persons of modest income who must, therefore, stay near home and at the same time avoid the ever-recurring race discrimination it is a puzzling query as to what to do with vacations. THE CRISIS has asked its readers to tell each other something about their more successful vacations and as a slight incentive we have offered a few small prizes. The essay winning the first prize is appended.

THE BEST SUMMER I EVER SPENT.
By H. H. THWEATT.

IT was a few feeks after the close of my term as principal of the High School at Thomasville, Ga., that I decided, in company with my wife, who was one of my assistant teachers, to leave the city for absolute rest-if there is any such thing.
I already had on my desk several tempting invitations from out of town patrons and friends to "come and stay awhile."
Mr. Dennis Perkins, a lusty rural youth of about eighteen years, had been attending my school to get a literary foundation of study for the ministry. His people also had invited us to their humble, but hospitable, old fashioned, commodious log cabin, located about twenty miles southeast of Boston, Ga., in the very center of a turpentine and farming district which was about ten miles from

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SCENES FROM IDLEWILD

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