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{SPEAKER name="Brooks B. Robinson"}
The literary corner: Black writers of the world. A series of analyses and interpretations of Black world literature.
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I'm Brooks Robinson, and today you'll hear Eldred D. Jones discuss the works of one of Africa's most prominent contemporary African-English fiction or prose writers.
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He is Chinua Achebe. Eldred Jones is professor and principal at Fourah College in Sierra Leone, West Africa. As a critic, he's written analyses on Elizabethan images of Africa and on the writings of Chinua Achebe.

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Jones is also the editor of Africa Literature Today. In the interview, you'll hear Jones discuss the lives and works of Chinua Achebe.

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{SPEAKER name="Eldred Jones"} Chinua Achebe first hit the literary world with his novel "Things Fall Apart",

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which was an examination of the breakup of an African traditional society, an Igbo traditional society, uh after the first impact of European missionary civilization.

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It's really focused on one of the traditional heroes of the village, one of the people who upheld the values of village life.

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But who did not have the weapons to fight against the new uh missionary impact, backed by the forces of imperialism.

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{SPEAKER name="Brooks B. Robinson"} mm-hmm. [[affirmative]]

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{SPEAKER name="Eldred Jones"} So he declared war on the new regime, total war, without any--

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