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Transcription: [00:00:14]
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{SPEAKER name="Brooks B. Robinson"}
The Literary Corner: Black Writers of the World

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{Second speaker??}
The world was choked in wet embrace of serpent spawn awaiting Ayentallas(?) rebel birth monster child.

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Wrestling pachyderms of myth - [[Orunsila?]], Orumila, Esu, [[Efa?]], were all assembled.

[00:00:58]
Defeated in the quest to fraternize man. Wordlessly, he rose. Sought knowledge in the hills.

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Ogun, the lone one, saw it all. The sacred veins of matter and the second laws.

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Sagun's spent thunderbolt save him a hammerhead.

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His fingers taught Efco, and it yielded. To think, a mere plague of finite kills stood between the gods and man.

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He made a mesh of elements: from stone of fire, and air fruit.

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The worlds of energies.

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He made an anvil of peace. And kneaded red clay for his mold.

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In his hand, the weapon gleamed, borne of primal mechanics. And this pledge, he gave the Heavens:

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"I will clear a path to man (?). May we celebrate the stray electron defined of patents. Celebrate this plating of the gods, canonization of a strong hand of a slave who set the rock in the revolution.

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All hail Saint Atundah! Fifth revolutionary grand iconoclast at Genesis."




Transcription Notes:
Hard to really distinguish what was being said between the 00:00:50 mark and the 00:00:58 mark. It seems that they are characters in a myth so its really a cultural difference when it comes to how they would have spelled out the names vs how I would spell out the name.

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